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Is there an anti-catnip: something that would make a cat languid

  1. Nov 29, 2007 #1
    ... so that I can cut its nails without losing an eye or needing major reconstructive surgery.

    my cat is usually well behaved, but cutting its nails is next to impossible. and I really don't want to have its nails removed; it seems rather cruel.

    is there a plant or drink or something that I could give my cat that would relax it?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 29, 2007 #2

    turbo

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    Just rock it to sleep. Don't use real big rocks, though.:uhh:
     
  4. Nov 29, 2007 #3

    Evo

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    You should contact your veterinarian.
     
  5. Nov 29, 2007 #4

    Danger

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    Lucy scraps like a maniac when I clip her. My solution is that I roll her up in a big towel like an enchilada, then pull one paw out at a time to work on. It doesn't completely eliminate the growling and biting, but it certainly makes the job easier.
     
  6. Nov 29, 2007 #5
    Here are some ideas.

    Wiki - How to shorten a cat.
    It seems there is more than one way to skin a cat, and that suits me fine.
     
  7. Nov 29, 2007 #6

    matthyaouw

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    Rohypnol*






    *Matt accepts no responsibility for damage to any felines resulting from reading this post
     
  8. Nov 29, 2007 #7

    :rofl: ok, so now I have a plans B... and Z


    I don't want to have to take it to the vet every time I want to cut its nails though. I could try the enchilada one while he's already sleepy maybe... he might not notice we're cutting his nails if he's all wrapped up like that haha
     
  9. Nov 29, 2007 #8
    Hope your useing animal nail trimmers, even then you half to replace the blade every once in a while, or it hurts them.
    I have used Dangers solution, and it works very well...with the addition of a soft cloth wrap muzzle, so they cant bite.
     
  10. Nov 29, 2007 #9

    Astronuc

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    Vet's will do it, but I usually hold the cat while my wife cuts the nails/claws. By oneself, the best way is to wrap the cat in a towel and cut the claws (as Danger mentioned) with the cat in one's lap, or straddle the cat if it struggles too much.

    I'm not so concerned about being scratch or bitten (which has happened several times), but I just don't want to injure the animal.

    One could use a tranquilizer such as acepromazine, which some vets may use.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acepromazine

    We've used it, but sparingly. As with many compounds, one must use it carefully according to body mass.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2007
  11. Nov 29, 2007 #10

    Kurdt

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    We've never had to cut a cats nails in all the time we've had them. I thought it was something you only did to dogs. :uhh:
     
  12. Nov 29, 2007 #11

    Moonbear

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    If at all possible, I would avoid using sedatives or tranquilizers for something like clipping nails. Frequent use of those just isn't healthy for the cat.

    My cat gets all worked up about clipping nails too. I've never cut too far, yet she howls as if I'm amputating a toe with every snip. :rolleyes:

    I haven't had to resort to the towel trick yet, but that is effective if you can get the towel around them snugly enough. :biggrin:

    The cat has conveniently hidden at the very thought of this thread, so I can't grab her at the moment to verify my technique for holding her. While much of it is a "whatever works" approach, I *think* I usually have her sitting on my lap, back against my chest, and paws pointing away from me. I can then get my left arm around her chest, tucked under her left leg leg (right up under her "armpit") so she can't really do much with that one, and hold the right front paw by reaching around her...I don't worry so much about her kicking her hind legs...if I stretch her out enough, she can't do any damage with them. So, that gets paw #1. To get the other front paw, since I can't operate the clippers left-handed, I reach the hand with clippers under her right armpit, and hold her left paw with my left hand. Sometimes I have to reposition after every couple claws as she wriggles around. The hind legs are usually more of a challenge, because she's also determined to escape being held still by then. I think I just become some sort of contortionist tucking her head under my arm, getting my elbow around her front paws, and hanging on for dear life to the hind paws. You can hold on pretty tight without hurting the cat. Then again, my cat doesn't really go for blood when I'm trimming claws, she's just focused on wiggling free because she doesn't like staying still.

    Something that can make it a bit easier with time is to play with their paws and hold them the way you would to trim their claws, but without actually trimming. I do that with Ember so she doesn't associate having her paws messed with only with having claws trimmed. I also will play with her ears and open her mouth from time to time so none of this is overly strange when she visits the vet either.
     
  13. Nov 29, 2007 #12

    turbo

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    Animals of all types appreciate positive feedback, and if you take the time, you can often avoid making them nervous or panicky. Like Moonie, when I picked up my ferrets, I would sometimes give them a quick examination, looking at their eyes, ears, teeth, palpating their muscles, etc. None of them ever gave me any trouble at the vets, nor did they give me a hard time about clipping their nails, because they knew there would be a tasty treat afterward. I once had a conure (beautiful little parrot) that was scared to death to have her wings handled to get her flight feathers clipped and she had a pretty potent bite! I made a game out it. I'd say "Allie, wings!" and touch her back between the bases of her wings, and when she reflexively raised her wings a bit, I'd praise her and give her a nice treat (dried hot chili peppers were her favorite). The higher she would raise her wings the more praise and attention she got. Within a few days, I didn't have to even be near her - I'd just say "Allie, wings!" in a cheerful voice and she would pose like a hood ornament. She would hold the pose until I called her a good bird and then she expected a treat. I didn't have to handle her wings to trim her feathers, and she got a nice treat after the trim.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2007
  14. Nov 29, 2007 #13

    EnumaElish

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    Felines can read!?? :smile:
     
  15. Nov 29, 2007 #14

    EnumaElish

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    On a related topic, does anyone know anything about how felines react to ethyl alcohol?
     
  16. Nov 29, 2007 #15

    JasonRox

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    You can get them surgically removed and never that to worry about them.
     
  17. Nov 29, 2007 #16

    DaveC426913

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    You don't have to get them surgically removed. If you just miss a couple of their meals they'll leave on their own. :biggrin:
     
  18. Nov 29, 2007 #17

    Danger

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    :rofl:
    Jason, declawing is essentially amputation of the last toe joint. It's extremely cruel and leaves the cat defenseless if it happens to get into a perilous situation. No true cat lover would ever think of it.

    By the bye, I don't actually trim Lucy's back claws. The only time that they cause any damage is when she launches herself off of my lap at warp speed. Clipping the front ones is for the sake of the carpets, the furniture, the bedding, W's epidermis, and any stray shreddible objects that might be lying about the place.
    I'm sure that the neighbour's dog also appreciates it. She comes over to visit frequently, and her first action upon entering the house is to empty the cat-food dish. Lucy has taken to swatting her without prior notice. :approve:
     
  19. Nov 29, 2007 #18

    Moonbear

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    I don't consider declawing extremely cruel, but it IS surgery, and is painful while they recover (though you can give them painkillers too), so I wouldn't take it lightly either. I look at it as a last resort if keeping their claws trimmed and directing their scratching toward approved surfaces (i.e., the scratching post) doesn't work, and it's either declawing or having them destroy the entire house with scratching (some cats are much worse than others about that). Not being able to hang onto the cat to trim their claws isn't a very good reason for declawing though. It's a good reason to schedule a visit to the vet's office to have them show you how to do it...you don't even need to see a vet, just one of the vet techs...they're the ones that do the claw trimmings and teeth cleanings anyway.
     
  20. Nov 30, 2007 #19

    vanesch

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    :bugeye:
    You people are special! The thing that comes with cats are claws.

    Our cats do scratch the wallpaper from the wall, do destroy the seats of the chairs, and so on, but we consider that that is part of having cats! It gives some feline charm to the house... On top of that, such behaviour makes my mother-in-law go crazy, so I usually give them some dried fish they're crazy about when they do this :rofl:
     
  21. Nov 30, 2007 #20

    Kurdt

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    If you can't teach a cat to not scratch certain things to the point where you're considering surgery then you shouldn't have a cat. I'm with Vanesch. They have claws and thats part of the package. Any type of unnecessary surgery on an animal is cruel.
     
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