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Is this an acceptable way to describe gravity

  1. May 6, 2013 #1
    Instead of saying that matter and energy curve spacetime, could one say: space and time curve around the presence of matter and energy?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 6, 2013 #2

    WannabeNewton

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    I see literally no difference in those two statements.
     
  4. May 6, 2013 #3
    Ha! That's good. Because when I read the second way of describing gravity, it makes things much clearer.
     
  5. May 6, 2013 #4

    phinds

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    No, I think the second part needs to be " ... spacetime curves around ... "

    I don't think "space and time" is the same as "spacetime" since the former implies that they are separate things and that is NOT a good way of looking at things in GR.
     
  6. May 6, 2013 #5
    Newton:

    Do you agree with Phinds?
     
  7. May 6, 2013 #6

    WannabeNewton

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    Honestly, I'm not a fan of putting things in words. The wording of physical principles can be quite subjective and ambiguous. As far as general relativity is concerned, ##G_{ab} = 8\pi T_{ab}## is the fundamental relationship between the matter fields and the space-time metric. You can decorate that statement however you like if it makes things clearer but the basic principle is as stated above. It is certainly true that space-time is a single entity but the semantic details can, as I said, be quite subjective and ambiguous. This is why things are presented mathematically.
     
  8. May 6, 2013 #7
    Newton, I have another question, and I'll just ask it here instead of start another thread. I'm watching a DVD and it is discussing, among other things, the "Theory of Everything" and the way in which we'll arrive at it. Below is the graphic presented in the DVD.

    Electricity.....Magnetism (separation between these two) Gravity
    Electromagnetism......Weak force
    Electroweak force......color force
    Grand Unified Force

    Theory of Everything (arrows connecting gravity with Grand Unified Force)

    Where are the strong and weak nuclear forces?
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2013
  9. May 6, 2013 #8

    phinds

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    Just FYI, it is strongly discouraged on this forum to start a new question in the same thread. Start a new thread for a new question.

    Also, Google is your friend. Strong and weak forces are very well-known terms.
     
  10. May 6, 2013 #9
    Okay, Phinds. I'll ask it on another thread. I was just trying not to take up too much room.
     
  11. May 6, 2013 #10

    PeterDonis

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    Also, this is probably not the best forum to post questions about the strong and weak forces; either the quantum physics forum or the high energy particle physics forum would probably be better, if you have questions after you've Googled.
     
  12. May 6, 2013 #11
    When you repost your question send me a PM and I can assist you on the TOE and GUT
     
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