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Knowledge needed to be an engineer?

  1. Jul 17, 2006 #1
    Hi, I am currently taken Pre Cal and it seems to be really easy to me (I have a 101 average right now =0 ) and I was wondering what is the highest math that you need to become an engineer that like makes highways, bridges, buildings, and stuff like that.

    Also, is Calculas AB and BC just as hard or harder than Pre Cal? Also am I smart or average for haveing a 101 in Pre Cal or is everybody else just dumb (everybody in my class has 80 and below)?:surprised
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 17, 2006 #2
    You have a long road ahead of you as far as mathematics goes. It definitely gets more interesting however.

    You might be smart, or you may not. It really depends on a lot of factors. Some people are good test takers, some people are good at memorizing formulas and applying them without thinkings, some people are horrible at memorizing formulas but can really hold down theory and apply concepts to new ideas. I personally think memorizing formulas is important in some aspects, but in general being able to apply your knowledge to the unknown is a hell of a lot more important.

    Sure you are smart... but who really cares? You are not giong to be able to apply for a job and be like, "Well Company X, I got a 101 in pre-calc. You deserve to have someone like this working for you."

    Congrats on the A in the class, just keep it up for the rest of your courses. As far as what math you have to take, again this depends on a lot of factors. It will depend on what type of engineering you do, and how far you go with your education. Are you going to persue a masters, or a PhD?
     
  4. Jul 17, 2006 #3
    Typically any level of calculus should be more difficult than pre-calculus since the material you learn in calculus is based somewhat upon everything you have learned before as well as the very important concept of the limit. Second I will make no judgement as to whether you are smart or not based on nothing more than your grade in a math class because the grade alone says nothing at all about your intelligence, you could have a 101 because the teacher is incredibly easy, offers large amounts of extra cresit that you have chosen to do, or many other possible reasons.
     
  5. Jul 17, 2006 #4
    You guys make all great point but the teacher does not give extra credit except for 3 bonues on test which are 5 point each and half the class has 70-80 average.

    Also nobody is a good or bad test taker I just that they dont know the stuff like in my class people copy off of me and they have tolled me that they tell there parent that they make good grade but are bad test takers. Also we dont have to memorize fomulas we get a sheet with them but I know most of them but not all the names
     
  6. Jul 17, 2006 #5
    You guys make all great point but the teacher does not give extra credit except for 3 bonues on test which are 5 point each and half the class has 70-80 average.

    Also nobody is a good or bad test taker I just that they dont know the stuff like in my class people copy off of me and they have tolled me that they tell there parent that they make good grade but are bad test takers. Also we dont have to memorize fomulas we get a sheet with them but I know most of them but not all the names

    And I know that I cant get a job just by haveing a good grade in pre cal Im no an idiot!
     
  7. Jul 17, 2006 #6
    Even so, offering a possibility of 15 bonus points on every test is quite a bit of extra credit.

    This isn't nexessarily true. A test can be a stressful situation and not all people will react the same way under stress. Yes how well they know the material does play an important part of this, but I think that stress can play an equal part and if one cannot cope well this situation or the stress of it then as a consequence they will probably not do as well on the test regardless of whether or not they know the material.

    I don't think there really is that much to memorize in a pre-calculus class that you would need a sheet of formulas, there are maybe four identities that you should memorize that you can derive the rest from.
     
  8. Jul 17, 2006 #7
    Obviously. You have a 101 in precalc! :tongue:
     
  9. Jul 17, 2006 #8
    From what I've seen and heard from others, most 4 year engineering programs are going to require calc 1 through multivariable calculus (calc 3 or 4 depending on how the schools terms are set up), you will also need to take an intro course in differential equations and linear algebra.
     
  10. Jul 17, 2006 #9
    Stay the duration of the program, young man... Let us know at the end of your final year whether the 101 in Pre-Calc really was of use.

    You have many interesting lessons ahead of you. Don't place too much stock in Pre-Calculus. Aim for a degree Summa Cum Laude & if you succeed, then you will be reasonably bright - if not, then at least you will be an Engineer. Enjoy the journey.
     
  11. Jul 17, 2006 #10

    J77

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    Well done on your 101 - I take it that's good - keep up the good work! :cool:
     
  12. Jul 17, 2006 #11
    Hey thx guys for the reponses! I do plan on going into Calculas AB and BC and I will try my best. I just hope I dont get put in the class as all my friends or then I will scruw up :(
     
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