Leonardo’s Perpetual Motion Machines

In summary, the conversation discusses the idea of perpetual motion machines and the website selling them as art pieces. It is mentioned that Leonardo decided against investigating perpetual motion further, citing Newton's Third Law of Motion. This leads to a discussion about the origins of the law and its connection to Zeno's paradox.
  • #1
dkotschessaa
1,060
783
Obviously they don't work, perpetually, but they're really cool anyway:

http://www.leonardodavincisinventions.com/mechanical-inventions/leonardo-perpetual-motion-machine/

perpetual-motion-leonardo-da-vinci-3a-300x225.jpg
 
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  • #3
Ban and lock in 3, 2, 1...
 
  • #4
FYI, the site makes no claims for the machines to work, and simply sells them as art pieces.
 
  • #5
Borek said:
Ban and lock in 3, 2, 1...
0.5, 0.25, 0.125, wait for it, wait for it...
 
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  • #6
Leonardo decided against investigating perpetual motion any further after he wrote (in mirror writing) beside the designs – “for every action there is an opposite and equal reaction” (the machines will not work). That quote is also Isaac Newtons Third Law of Motion, 200 years before Newton was born!
Now, this is very interesting. Newton ascribed the discovery of the third law to his contemporaries in the Royal Society. He wasn't aware anyone had realized it or voiced it before them. That being the case, it is intriguing to see Leonardo had written it down as far back as the Renaissance. I am now curious to know if there's any record of it before Leonardo anywhere.
 
  • #7
berkeman said:
0.5, 0.25, 0.125, wait for it, wait for it...
The very first thing that came to mind upon seeing this was Zeno's paradox. I wonder what sort of person this makes me...
 

Related to Leonardo’s Perpetual Motion Machines

1. What is Leonardo's Perpetual Motion Machine?

Leonardo's Perpetual Motion Machine is a hypothetical device designed to continuously generate motion or energy without the need for an external source of power. It was first proposed by the Italian artist and inventor Leonardo da Vinci in the 15th century.

2. Did Leonardo's Perpetual Motion Machine actually work?

No, Leonardo's Perpetual Motion Machine was never built or proven to work. It remains a theoretical concept and has not been successfully created or demonstrated.

3. What was Leonardo's inspiration for the Perpetual Motion Machine?

Leonardo was inspired by the idea of creating a machine that could run indefinitely without the need for human intervention. He was also influenced by ancient Greek and Roman designs of perpetual motion machines.

4. What were some of the challenges in creating a Perpetual Motion Machine?

One of the main challenges was overcoming the laws of thermodynamics, which state that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred. Leonardo's designs also faced practical challenges such as friction and wear and tear.

5. Why is Leonardo's Perpetual Motion Machine still studied today?

Leonardo's Perpetual Motion Machine is still studied today because it represents an important part of scientific history and the quest for perpetual motion. It also serves as a reminder of the limitations of human knowledge and the importance of experimentation and innovation in scientific advancements.

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