Let's Discuss the Ways of Making Graphene

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In summary, the conversation discusses different methods for producing graphene, with a focus on mass production. The most promising methods include CVD and epitaxial growth, but for non-electronic applications, using a suspension of graphene oxide may be more cost-effective. Exfoliated graphene is also mentioned as a high-quality option for research purposes, but it is not scalable for mass production.
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ErolDynamics
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Hello everyone;
I have been working in a research group whose aim is to develop and making graphene-based nanoelectronic device. http://labs.sabanciuniv.edu/qtnel/ I am undergraduate student that's why I could be considered source of this laboratory by making mechanically exfoliated graphene on SiC. I also make graphene through expitaxial growth in UHV and CVD. I would like to know are there any way that could led graphene to mass producted material except from these three ways?

Any comment will be appreciated :)
 
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  • #2
ErolDynamics said:
I would like to know are there any way that could led graphene to mass producted material except from these three ways?
The most promising ways for making high quality single layer graphene seem to be CVD and epitaxially via Si evaporation from SiC, though the CVD method seems to be improving at a faster rate. If you're not interested in electronic quality (e.g., if you want to focus on mechanical properties instead), making a suspension of graphene oxide and reducing it is going to be orders of magnitude cheaper than growing it one layer at a time via CVD.

EDIT: exfoliated graphene probably gives the best quality material for basic research, but it's utterly unscalable.
 

Related to Let's Discuss the Ways of Making Graphene

1. What is graphene and why is it important?

Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice pattern. It is important because it has unique properties such as high strength, electrical conductivity, and flexibility, making it useful in various applications including electronics, energy storage, and biomedical devices.

2. How is graphene made?

Graphene can be made through various methods including mechanical exfoliation, chemical vapor deposition, and epitaxial growth. The most common and scalable method is chemical vapor deposition, where a thin layer of carbon atoms is deposited on a substrate using a hydrocarbon gas and heat.

3. What are the challenges in making graphene?

One of the main challenges in making graphene is achieving large-scale production while maintaining high quality and consistency. Another challenge is finding ways to integrate graphene into existing technologies and processes. Additionally, the high cost of production and potential environmental impacts are also challenges that need to be addressed.

4. What are the potential applications of graphene?

Graphene has a wide range of potential applications in various industries. It can be used in electronics for faster and more efficient devices, in energy storage for improved batteries and supercapacitors, and in biomedical devices for drug delivery and biosensors. Other potential applications include water filtration, aerospace materials, and flexible displays.

5. What research is currently being done on graphene?

There is ongoing research on graphene in many areas, including improving production methods, exploring new applications, and understanding its properties and potential limitations. Researchers are also investigating ways to combine graphene with other materials to create new composites with enhanced properties. Additionally, there is research being done on the potential health and environmental impacts of graphene and how to mitigate any risks.

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