Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

I Linear attenuation coefficient

  1. Feb 12, 2018 #1
    Is linear attenuation coefficient a constant for a given material or will it depend on the thickness of the material?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2018 #2

    Gene Naden

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    It is "per unit thickness." To me, that implies that it is independent of the thickness of the material.
     
  4. Feb 12, 2018 #3

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    -1

    "per unit thickness" usually means the attenuation per meter, or per foot of thickness depending on the units.

    You have to scale it to the actual thickness you are using.

    So for example if you had insulation rated at 1W per degree C per square meter per unit thickness but you were only using a sheet 0.1m thick, then the loss would be 10W per degree C per square meter.
     
  5. Feb 12, 2018 #4
    Attenuation of what?
     
  6. Feb 12, 2018 #5

    ChrisVer

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    you mean 0.1W ?
     
  7. Feb 12, 2018 #6

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    No. The thinner the insulation the more power leaks through it. If 1W leaks through a unit thickness (1m) then ten times as much (10W) leaks through a 0.1m thick layer.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted