Linear fit, force intercept with X-uncertainties

In summary: A = [a_1~a_2~ \dots ~a_n]^T## that we want to estimate, we can write the sum of the squared differences between the measurements and their estimates asE = ∑(i=1..n) (x_{i}-y_{i})^2.The problem is that this equation is not linear. In particular, if we plot the data points, we see that the line does not fit the data well.To solve this problem, we need to find a linear equation that fits the data. One way to do this is to use a computer program to find a linear equation that
  • #1
16
2
I have some experimental data, in this case, we performed a study of the Zeeman effect in Cadmium with the use of a Fabry-Perot inferferometer. The data should fit a straight line, but I would like to force the intercept through the origin since the relation between the wavenumber difference and the magnetic field is proportionality.

My problem is that both x and y experimental values have significant uncertanties, and I am not sure of how to calculate the estimated uncertainty of the fit parameter, being the relevant result of the experiment.

The data are the following:

x-----------y
B (mT) \ Δν (1/m)
756 \ 61,25
621 \ 47,06
518 \ 45,30
414 \ 33,54

The Attempt at a Solution


I've been reading a chapter in Press et al. Numerical Recipes on how to perform the same analysis without forcing the intercept. It seems rather difficult, I wonder if it gets any easier if the intercept is forced, since there is only one fit parameter.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
marksman95 said:
estimated uncertainty of the fit parameter
Hi marksman95:

Although I know nothing about the Zeeman effect nor about cadmium, I am familiar with data fitting.
marksman95 said:
The data should fit a straight line
For a linear fit, y = a x + b. You have four data points {(xi, yi), i = 1..4}. Therefore each data point has the following error with respect to the linear fit.
Ei = a xi + b - yi, i = 1..4
You want to calculate the values of a and b that minimizes the sum of the squares of Ei:
E = ∑(i=1..4) (a xi + b - yi)2.​
Do you know how to proceed from this? If you are certain a must be zero, you may use that in your calculations.

Regards,
Buzz
 
  • #3
Thanks for your reply, Buzz. I am familiar with data fitting up to the point you have made. I know how the least squares parameters are obtained from the data and all (I'm a graduate physicist already, I don't know much but this, I do know.)

My question was much more specific and I have been in trouble finding answers in the common bibliography used for numerical methods, as I pointed out.

As I said, thank you anyway!
 
  • #4
marksman95 said:
My question was much more specific
Hi marksman95:

I am sorry I misunderstood what you were asking. Would you rephrase the specific question to make it clearer.

Regards,
Buzz
 
  • #5
I know that least squares methods are often presented as sets of formulas. If you understand the theory behind the formulas, you can derive them yourself for any special case. Then you can use the results to estimate parameters like standard error. So, first a little bit of theory.

Given ##m## (row) vectors of ##n## independent variables ##X_i \equiv [x_{i1}, x_{i2}, \dots ,x_{in}], 1\leq i \leq m## and ##m## dependent variables (measurements) ##y_i, 1\leq i \leq m##, and a vector of linear fit parameters ##A = [a_1~a_2~ \dots ~a_n]^T## that we want to estimate, we can write the sum of the squared differences between the measurements and their estimates as
marksman95 said:
I have some experimental data, in this case, we performed a study of the Zeeman effect in Cadmium with the use of a Fabry-Perot inferferometer. The data should fit a straight line, but I would like to force the intercept through the origin since the relation between the wavenumber difference and the magnetic field is proportionality.

My problem is that both x and y experimental values have significant uncertanties, and I am not sure of how to calculate the estimated uncertainty of the fit parameter, being the relevant result of the experiment.

The data are the following:

x-----------y
B (mT) \ Δν (1/m)
756 \ 61,25
621 \ 47,06
518 \ 45,30
414 \ 33,54

The Attempt at a Solution


I've been reading a chapter in Press et al. Numerical Recipes on how to perform the same analysis without forcing the intercept. It seems rather difficult, I wonder if it gets any easier if the intercept is forced, since there is only one fit parameter.
It sounds as though you are looking for a Total Least Squares solution. Here is a wikipedia article that describes the technique. Perhaps you have already found this technique in your research. This article does use your problem as a specific example.
 
  • #6
Of course!

The question is: how to make a linear fit, force the intercept to 0, and calculate the standard error for the slope if both X and Y have significant uncertainties.

I think it is enough clear this way.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • #7
tnich said:
I know that least squares methods are often presented as sets of formulas. If you understand the theory behind the formulas, you can derive them yourself for any special case. Then you can use the results to estimate parameters like standard error. So, first a little bit of theory.

Given ##m## (row) vectors of ##n## independent variables ##X_i \equiv [x_{i1}, x_{i2}, \dots ,x_{in}], 1\leq i \leq m## and ##m## dependent variables (measurements) ##y_i, 1\leq i \leq m##, and a vector of linear fit parameters ##A = [a_1~a_2~ \dots ~a_n]^T## that we want to estimate, we can write the sum of the squared differences between the measurements and their estimates as

It sounds as though you are looking for a Total Least Squares solution. Here is a wikipedia article that describes the technique. Perhaps you have already found this technique in your research. This article does use your problem as a specific example.

Oh, nice! I will check that tomorrow. Thanks for the effort.
 

1. What is a linear fit?

A linear fit is a statistical method used to determine the best-fitting straight line through a set of data points. This line is often used to represent the relationship between two variables.

2. What is force intercept?

Force intercept is the point at which the linear fit line intercepts the y-axis. This value represents the force at which the dependent variable would be zero.

3. Why are X-uncertainties important in linear fit?

X-uncertainties, also known as independent variable uncertainties, are important in linear fit because they represent the errors or variations in the x-values. These uncertainties can affect the accuracy of the linear fit and should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results.

4. How is a linear fit with X-uncertainties calculated?

A linear fit with X-uncertainties is typically calculated using a method called weighted least squares. This method takes into account both the uncertainties in the x-values and the y-values to determine the best-fitting line.

5. What does the slope of a linear fit represent?

The slope of a linear fit represents the rate of change or the relationship between the two variables. It is calculated by dividing the change in the y-values by the change in the x-values, and can be interpreted as the amount that the dependent variable changes for every unit increase in the independent variable.

Suggested for: Linear fit, force intercept with X-uncertainties

Replies
2
Views
372
Replies
5
Views
839
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
512
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
690
Replies
5
Views
494
Replies
18
Views
1K
Back
Top