Live volcanic eruption in Canary Islands, Spain

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I know, volcanic eruptions arent that rare but this one started a few hours ago and there are live pictures from various local tv stations
 
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  • #2
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1632071767801.png
 
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  • #3
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The Cumbre has a predetermined breaking fault. It would be interesting to know whether it is affected by the current outbreak or not.
 
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mcastillo356
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The Cumbre has a predetermined breaking fault. It would be interesting to know whether it is affected by the current outbreak or not.
It would be very interesting to know. In fact it is the great underlying question, without undermining the great concern and uncertainty of these moments.
 
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This is a burning tree, not ashes.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmQVquojJfo

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blbUlFW8lz0

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  • #6
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Updated live video link - that original one seems to have run its course (and I don't think I can edit after a certain time?)

 
  • #7
Astronuc
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https://news.yahoo.com/spanish-island-braces-possible-earthquakes-102021556.html
LOS LLANOS DE ARIDANE, Spain (AP) — A volcano on Spain’s Atlantic Ocean island of La Palma erupted Sunday after a weeklong buildup of seismic activity, prompting authorities to evacuate thousands as lava flows destroyed isolated houses and threatened to reach the coast. New eruptions continued into the night.

The Canary Islands Volcanology Institute reported the initial eruption shortly after 3 p.m. near the southern end of the island, which saw its last eruption in 1971. Huge red plumes topped with black-and-white smoke shot out along the Cumbre Vieja volcanic ridge, which scientists had been closely watching following the accumulation of molten lava below the surface and days of small earthquakes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbre_Vieja

La Palma is the island of concern with respect to a massive chunk falling into the Atlantic Ocean setting off a tsunami that could/would impact the Caribbean Islands and Atlantic Coast of US (North America).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbre_Vieja_tsunami_hazard
 
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  • #8
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The link to the live videos seems to change every now and then but it's still being streamed by local tv there.
A new fissure has opened overnight (with a rumble of 3.8) and another area has had to be evacuated, now around 6000 people. There've been some amazing but sad pictures of the lava engulfing homes.
Local tv link https://rtvc.es/en-directo/
 
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https://news.yahoo.com/spanish-island-braces-possible-earthquakes-102021556.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbre_Vieja

La Palma is the island of concern with respect to a massive chunk falling into the Atlantic Ocean setting off a tsunami that could/would impact the Caribbean Islands and Atlantic Coast of US (North America).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbre_Vieja_tsunami_hazard
There were articles alluding to this last week, before the volcano but probably in response to a series of tremors happening since the saturday before the eruption for example this

It sounds like one of those implausible worst case scenarios that wil never happen until you think of how many of those worst-case-never-happen scenarios have happened in the last two years.
 
  • #10
anorlunda
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La Palma is the island of concern with respect to a massive chunk falling into the Atlantic Ocean setting off a tsunami that could/would impact the Caribbean Islands and Atlantic Coast of US (North America).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbre_Vieja_tsunami_hazard
From the Wikipedia article:
Testing whether a given tsunami model is correct is complicated by the rarity of giant collapses. The term "megatsunami" has been defined by media and has no precise definition, although it is commonly taken to refer to tsunamis over 100 metres (330 ft) high.

Likely or not, statements like that attract lots of journalistic attention, and make Hollywood disaster movies. It's a certainty that a tsunami will hit the USA East Coast someday, and that an asteroid will collide with Earth, and that the Sun will expand to a red giant. So what?
 
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So what?
I will definitely be concerned if Yellowstone or Napoli reports a major eruption. And the Cumbre is interesting because his (existing) fault widens every time encapsulated rainwater is vaporized. So if the eruption took place near that fault, it meant an additional countdown to the major event.

I remember a television documentary in which an American geologist said, "If I lived in New York, I would certainly stay within range of a television."
 
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  • #13
Astronuc
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Likely or not, statements like that attract lots of journalistic attention, and make Hollywood disaster movies. It's a certainty that a tsunami will hit the USA East Coast someday, and that an asteroid will collide with Earth, and that the Sun will expand to a red giant. So what?
I don't think people should neurotically obsess over catastrophes portrayed by Hollywood, but certainly, if some major event is likely to happen, which could mean 1/100 to 1/100,000 years, or 10-6 years-1, one could or should be prepared, as much as one should be prepared for a Cat 5 hurricane or a 25 to 30 foot (8-10 m) tidal surge. It's a bit like having a tornado shelter in a region that is prone to tornadoes, or parts of California (or west coast) subject to earthquakes, or Seattle-Tacoma area prepared for an eruption of Mt. Rainier, or massive earthquake associated with the Juan de Fuca plate.

Not much one can do about an asteroid on a collision path with the earth, or the sun, but one can prepare for natural events, like weather or geological, and plan for advanced notice, as people do in Japan, sometimes. In the case of the Great Tohoku Earthquake of March 2011, many folks, including the government, ignored historic data that indicated the potential for such an earthquake and tsunami. The tremendous loss of life and incident at Fukushima Daiichi was entirely preventable, if folks had not ignored/neglected the evidence.
 
  • #14
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Lava flow is destroying homes, more than 100 so far. A video capture lava falling into swimming pool.
 
  • #15
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It's a tragedy for those affected but it's spectacular to see.
 
  • #16
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After a few days of images dominated by ash and poor visibiity, the volcano has entered into 'explosive phase', so more evacuations and more spectacular live images.
youtube here
and the local tv station here https://rtvc.es/en-directo/
 
  • #17
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La Palma volcano: Visual guide to what happened​

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-58681233
Data from Spain's National Geographic Institute shows how a series of small tremors began to take place on 11 September under a mountain range known as Cumbre Vieja, leading scientists to believe there could be magma pushing under the surface of the Earth.
This seismic activity gradually moved to the surface and, in the two days before the eruption, tremors were felt only 100m underground.

The Canary Islands Volcano Institute has suggested the eruption could last between 24 and 84 days.
 
  • #18
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I'm currently watching this




the sound is coming from the volcano, isn't it? With a delay on the sound (hard to judge distance from the images)? I've telling myself it might be just wind but the sound intensity more or less matches the image and there's a tree in the foreground doesn' seem to be moving

No no no IGNORE ME!!! That's probably the sound of the Atlantic Ocean somewhere behind the camera.
 
  • #19
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The volcano has stopped, a few hours ago, with the lava flow still not reached the sea.
The experts say they don't know whether it's stopped temporarily maybe with magma & gases accumulating somewhere, or if it really is switching off.

I mention it because the videos now don't have that roaring soundtrack so maybe it was the sound of the volcano and not the atlantic after all
 
  • #20
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A very short break, after several quiet hours it is erupting again, some say with a wider outlet and faster lava flow.
 
  • #22
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In the last couple of days the lava flow finally reached the sea and two more vents have opened up.

The live streaming of this really is spectacular (and possible unique?) - I can't imagine seeing anything to beat this.
 
  • #23
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Still going. Currently live pictures of lava flow advancing and burning all in its path. It's night time there so really does look spectacular and monstrous at the same time

Edited to add: No, they've changed the camera angle. Maybe the lava got too close

 
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