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Long Divison and the rule of 78

  1. Dec 2, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    u = f k(k + 1)/ n(n +1) f= 700, k =4, n=36


    2. Relevant equations
    u = 700 x 4(4 + 1)/36(36 + 1)


    3. The attempt at a solution
    700 x 20/1332 ≈ 10.51 I can't figure out how 20/1332 = 0.015015015, every time I divide it I get 0.0666, I literally have no clue how that is the answer. I feel so dumb.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 2, 2012 #2

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    What does this have to do with long division or the rule of 78?

    Are you actually doing long division?

    What is so difficult about calculating 20/1332? It looks to me like you might be dividing 1332 by 20 (and getting the decimal places wrong) rather than dividing 20 by 1332.
     
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