Looking for a Bottle Jack for a Hydraulic Car Jack

In summary, this car jack uses two pumps to reach maximum height, has a maximum height of 18 inches, and can lift a weight of 1.5 tons.
  • #1
Ludapower
15
0
All car jacks use a modified bottle jack (modified base).
A car jack like this:
Hydraulic_Floor_Jack.jpg


And a bottle jack like this, but with a modified base.
Hydraulic_Bottle_Jack.jpg


I'm trying to find a bottle jack with the modified base for a car jack. I'm making a car jack for a school project but can't find any spare parts for them anywhere.. Can anyone please help me find a bottle jack for one?

Thanks!
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Welcome to PF, Ludapower.
To start with, they're both 'car' jacks just as they are. The first example is called a 'floor' jack. Secondly, not all 'car' jacks are hydraulic. All of the ones that I had, which came with the cars, were stand-up ratchet jobs. Most rice-rockets and some European ones came with 'scissor' jacks, which use a lead-screw. I have a 12-tonne bottle jack that I got for my 4x4 El Camino, but it certainly isn't industry standard.
As for adapting a bottle jack into a floor jack, you need only work out some basic math to determine your leverage ratios, and make sure that you use the proper materials in the design.
 
  • #3
I ended up finding a perfect pump/piston for the job. I can finally get this project going, I'll try to get some pics up whenever it's finished.
 
  • #4
How about a teaser pic
HydraulicJack1.jpg
 
  • #5
Here's where I'm at with this..
DSCN3297.jpg
 
  • #6
Looking good! :approve:
 
  • #7
very impressive! Did you design that yourself from scratch or did you take dimensions from existing floor jacks? I like how low-profile it is. The floor jack I currently have is too tall to fit under some smaller Japanese cars - got to grab the fender and lift the body to get the jack under :)
 
  • #8
nice autocad draw
 
  • #9
triden said:
very impressive! Did you design that yourself from scratch or did you take dimensions from existing floor jacks? I like how low-profile it is. The floor jack I currently have is too tall to fit under some smaller Japanese cars - got to grab the fender and lift the body to get the jack under :)

Thanks!
I looked at a similar jack they had at CanadianTire (which is discontinued) and based it off that one. We decided to make it lower and correct all the defects that it had.
We're also using all aluminum and stainless steel parts. The only steel part are the 4 bolts that hold the pump and all the circlips.
 
  • #10
Ludapower said:
I looked at a similar jack they had at CanadianTire

Hey! Another Canuck on board?! Right on.
 
  • #11
aye?
 
  • #12
Eh! Yeah I'm from Quebec.
 
  • #13
Ludapower said:
Eh! Yeah I'm from Quebec.

That can be forgiven... :-p
 
  • #14
Here's a little update after I cleaned it up a bit.
th_DSCN3327.jpg

th_DSCN3330.jpg

th_DSCN3331.jpg
 

Attachments

  • th_DSCN3327.jpg
    th_DSCN3327.jpg
    4.1 KB · Views: 451
  • th_DSCN3330.jpg
    th_DSCN3330.jpg
    4.1 KB · Views: 420
Last edited:
  • #15
it looks really good. I am pretty sure it will fit in my low honda del sol!
 
  • #16
That's a very sweet looking piece of equipment, old bean.
What did you use for the engraving? (Or is that applied vinyl for the graphics?)
 
  • #17
It's all engraved with a #5 Center Drill, except for the TGM 2009 which was done with a 1/8" End Mill. There's my name and my partner's name on the side. TGM stands for Technique de Genie Mécanique (Mechanical engineering).
I painted over everything then sanded it off and polished the aluminum.
Old bean?
 
  • #18
You should resize your photos to 640x480 before posting them. That way it doesn't offset the entire page.
 
  • #19
Ludapower said:
Old bean?

It's a British term like chap, or bloke, or mate. Just a wink and a nod at your froggish background; no offense intended.
Were the drill and end mill computer controlled, or did you do it manually? In any event, it looks terrific. It's rare to see great engineering and art combined so well. :approve:
 
  • #20
Danger said:
It's a British term like chap, or bloke, or mate. Just a wink and a nod at your froggish background; no offense intended.
Were the drill and end mill computer controlled, or did you do it manually? In any event, it looks terrific. It's rare to see great engineering and art combined so well. :approve:
Right right, I'm just not used to hearing that expression. Not all Quebecers have a french background.. obviously I do though :D
Everything is computer controlled
th_DSC00623.jpg
 
  • #21
Time for mass production. I'm not sure what it's like in Canada, but in the American south, a jack like that would sell like hotcakes. Especially if you put some Type R and NOS stickers on it.

You'll be a millionaire in no time.
 
  • #22
It'd be too expensive. There's a lot of time put into it. Also the only materials used were aluminum and stainless steel. The SS alone makes it impractical to sell.
But yeah, Nos stickers would be sweet, it'd definitely make it go faster.
 
  • #23
Mostly done :D
th_DSCN3388.jpg

th_DSCN3387.jpg

th_DSCN3386.jpg

th_DSCN3385.jpg

th_DSCN3384.jpg

th_DSCN3383.jpg


Specs:
- Two pumps to reach maximum height (with no weight on it)
- 2.6 inches of clearance when lowered
- 18 inches maximum height
- 1.5 tons maximum lift weight
- Materials include Aluminum, Stainless steel and 4140 Steel

Everything made by me and my friend of course.
 
  • #24
Hi. I'm back for an hour or two.
Like any good piece of equipment, that thing looks even better in use than it did just sitting there. Congrats on a great project.
 
  • #25
ludapower, I am doing a similar project, where did you get the huraulic jack unit from??

thanks!
 
  • #26
I ordered a double valve pump from Canadian Tire, they had it shipped directly from Korea. I don't think they sell that specific jack anymore though. It wasn't very good quality though, I would suggest finding another similar jack and see if you can order the pump seperately.
Good luck!
 
  • #27
great, thanks for the quick reply!

i shall take a look, good design by the way!
 
  • #28
No problem, you're lucky I still get emails from this place, I haven't been on here in two years hahaha.
I'm in Industrial Design now, everyone makes fun of the flames. I admit it's pretty cheesy :)

Still works great though, I ended up replacing the hydraulic oil with motor oil because it was leaking everywhere.
 

Related to Looking for a Bottle Jack for a Hydraulic Car Jack

1. What is a bottle jack and how does it work?

A bottle jack is a type of hydraulic jack that is designed to lift heavy objects, such as cars, by using a pump mechanism to apply pressure to a small piston which in turn moves a larger piston to lift the object. The bottle shape of the jack allows for a compact design that can fit into tight spaces.

2. How do I choose the right bottle jack for my car?

The first step is to determine the weight of your car and make sure the bottle jack is capable of lifting that amount. You should also consider the height and width of the jack to ensure it will fit under your car. It is also important to check the maximum weight capacity and lift height of the jack to make sure it can handle your specific vehicle.

3. What is the difference between a hydraulic bottle jack and a floor jack?

A hydraulic bottle jack is designed for heavy lifting and can often support larger weight capacities than a floor jack. Bottle jacks are also more compact and portable, making them a good choice for on-the-go repairs. On the other hand, floor jacks are better suited for lifting lighter vehicles and offer more stability due to their wider base.

4. How do I maintain and store my bottle jack?

To ensure the longevity of your bottle jack, it is important to regularly clean and lubricate all moving parts. You should also store the jack in a dry, cool place to prevent rusting. When not in use, make sure the jack is fully lowered and the valve is closed to avoid air from entering the system.

5. Can I use a bottle jack for other purposes besides lifting a car?

Yes, bottle jacks can be used for various lifting and pressing applications, such as lifting heavy machinery or straightening bent metal. However, it is important to always follow the manufacturer's instructions and not exceed the weight capacity of the jack to ensure safety.

Similar threads

Replies
15
Views
3K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
7
Views
11K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
20
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
17
Views
6K
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
26
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
468
Back
Top