Looking for an equation and creator of it.

  • Thread starter chrishin
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation discusses an equation for the periodic oscillation of brightness of stars and the desire to know the name of the astrophysicist who developed it. Henrietta Swan Leavitt is mentioned as a possible scientist who has studied this topic.
  • #1
chrishin
3
0

Homework Statement



i've heard of this equation from somewhere ...

equation for periodic oscillation of brightness of stars.


would like to know this astrophysics's name to see what else he's done

Homework Equations



none

The Attempt at a Solution




he's also seen one of brightest solar flares or some periodic change or something...

also made another equation for reflection on the sky or something...

he's in Canada somewhere, Russian and something about might be Jewish background...
 
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  • #2
"periodic oscillation of brightness of stars."

Sounds like Cepheid variables. A Wiki search turns up the name of Henrietta Swan Leavitt?
 
Last edited:
  • #3
http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/astro-ph/pdf/0608/0608622v1.pdf
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #4
hmm thx... any idea on which scientist/ physicist though?
 

Related to Looking for an equation and creator of it.

1. Who is credited with creating the first equation?

The first known equations were created by the ancient Babylonians around 1800 BCE. However, the concept of equations can be traced back even further to ancient Egyptian and Greek mathematicians.

2. What is the purpose of equations in science?

In science, equations are used to describe and understand the relationships between various physical quantities and phenomena. They allow scientists to make predictions, test hypotheses, and communicate their findings to others.

3. How are equations developed?

Equations are developed through a combination of experimentation, observation, and mathematical reasoning. Scientists use data and observations from experiments to identify patterns and relationships, and then use mathematical principles and equations to describe and explain these patterns.

4. What makes a good equation?

A good equation should accurately represent the phenomenon it is describing, be based on sound scientific principles and data, be mathematically consistent, and be able to make accurate predictions. Additionally, a good equation should be simple and concise, making it easier to understand and use.

5. Can equations be wrong?

Yes, equations can be wrong if they are based on incorrect data or assumptions, or if they do not accurately represent the phenomenon they are describing. However, this is why the scientific method and peer review are important in the development and validation of equations, to ensure that they are as accurate and reliable as possible.

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