Looking for Phase change material

In summary, the individual is seeking a phase change material with high heat capacity to be embedded in a thin layer of silicon rubber for a flexible membrane project. They have considered magnesium nitrate hexahydrate but are concerned about its toxicity and flammability. They are asking for suggestions of alternative materials, such as liquid esters of palmitic acid, saturated fatty acid methyl or ethyl esters, cholesteryl esters, and rigid rod aromatic esters.
  • #1
martinl
3
0
Hi All,

I'm working on a project that requires a flexible membrane be heated and cooled about 2000 times.

During the cooling process, I require the material give off heat for as long a period of time as possible. I figure a phase change material will have the highest heat capacity and give off its latent heat, over an extended period of time, while cooling at it's melting point.

So, I'm looking for a phase change material that I can imbed in a thin layer of silicon rubber to form the heat sink part of my membrane.

I considered magnesium nitrate hexahydrate (melting point 87 C), but fear that it is too toxic and flammable. The final membrane will be handled extensively and twisted and bent many times over its lifetime.

Could someone please give me some more suggestions of what else to try?
As many as possible (I may want to mix them to even out the heat transfer over the temp range)

Thanks a lot.
 
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  • #2
Try the various esters of palmitic acid. Find some that are liquid at slightly higher than room temperature. Some other compounds you might consider are, in a general class, saturated fatty acid methyl or ethyl esters, cholesteryl esters, rigid rod aromatic esters.
 
Last edited:
  • #3


Hello there,

Thank you for reaching out to the community for suggestions on phase change materials. It sounds like you are working on a very interesting project, and I would be happy to offer some suggestions.

One potential phase change material you could consider is paraffin wax. It has a high heat capacity and can release its latent heat over a longer period of time during the cooling process. It also has a relatively low melting point (around 60-70 degrees Celsius) which may make it suitable for your project.

Another option could be a mixture of water and salt, such as sodium acetate. This combination can have a higher heat capacity than paraffin wax and can also release its latent heat over a longer period of time. It also has a lower melting point (around 50 degrees Celsius), making it a potentially safer and more versatile option for your project.

You may also want to consider using a combination of different materials to achieve your desired heat transfer over the temperature range. For example, you could use a mixture of paraffin wax and water/salt to create a customized phase change material that meets your specific needs.

I hope these suggestions are helpful to you and I wish you the best of luck with your project. Let us know if you have any further questions or need additional assistance. Happy experimenting!
 

1. What is the purpose of phase change materials?

Phase change materials (PCMs) are used to store and release thermal energy during a phase change, typically from solid to liquid or liquid to gas. They are commonly used for thermal energy storage in buildings, electronics, and renewable energy systems.

2. How do phase change materials work?

PCMs work by absorbing heat during the phase change from solid to liquid, and releasing heat during the reverse phase change from liquid to solid. This allows them to store and release thermal energy without a significant change in temperature.

3. What are the benefits of using phase change materials?

There are several benefits to using PCMs, including improved energy efficiency, reduced energy consumption, and increased comfort. They also have a high thermal storage capacity and can be easily integrated into existing systems.

4. What are some common applications of phase change materials?

PCMs have a wide range of applications, including thermal energy storage in buildings for heating and cooling, temperature regulation in electronics, and storing renewable energy for later use. They are also used in clothing and bedding for temperature regulation.

5. What factors should be considered when choosing a phase change material?

When looking for a phase change material, factors such as melting point, thermal conductivity, and compatibility with other materials should be considered. It is also important to consider the specific application and the desired thermal properties needed for optimal performance.

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