Losing the copyright when publishing a research article?

In summary, the conversation discusses the issue of copyright transfer and financial gain for authors when publishing a research article. The system of scientific publishing is questioned, as publishers make large profits while authors receive little compensation. The concept of open access and government intervention is also mentioned as a potential solution to this problem. Overall, the conversation highlights the complex dynamics and challenges within the world of scientific publishing.
  • #71


Andy Resnick said:
It's not as simple as that. Originally (I think this was one of the sticking points), NIH wanted *all* results obtained by NIH dollars to be open domain- including, for example, lab notebooks with the raw data.

For most of us, this is no big deal. For a drug company undertaking clinical trials of drugs, having the raw data openly available for, for example, a personal injury lawyer to peruse is a bad idea.

Yeah, I was sticking with the journal publishing issue for this thread. Indeed, there was a whole big minefield of things NIH wanted to open to the public that in an idealistic utopia would have been a wonderful idea, but in the real world of needing to make money and deal with lawyers and the way the relatively ignorant public would interpret scientific data, and such, were terrible in practical terms.
 

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