Magnet Movement Affects Current Magnitude

In summary: When we increase the strength of the magnet, we also increase the current. So, in summary, the magnitude of the current depends on the strength of the magnet.
  • #1
cyprusx
21
0
The magnitude of the current depends on the rate at which the magnet is moving in and out of the solenoid.

True or false
 
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  • #2
Have you considered flipping a coin?

Now you know you are expected to make some effort yourself. In this case, I assume you are talking about a generator consisting of a magnet moving inside a coil- You should have said that. What does your textbook say about generators? What formulas do you know for current?
 
  • #3
since voltage induced is proportional to the rate of change of B-field,i think magnitude is also dependent on it?
 
  • #4
i really have no clue, I am a noob
 
  • #5
cyprusx said:
i really have no clue, I am a noob
Consider Faraday's Law together with Ohm's law.
 
  • #6
man, i have too hand this in tomorrow and I am at risk of failing can you cut a guy a break
 
  • #7
cyprusx said:
man, i have too hand this in tomorrow and I am at risk of failing can you cut a guy a break

I will help you, but I am not going to give you the answer. However, if you do put some effort in, you will have the answer within minutes. Now, what is Faraday's law?
 
  • #8
Any change in the magnetic environment of a coil of wire will cause a voltage (emf) to be "induced" in the coil.
 
  • #9
cyprusx said:
Any change in the magnetic environment of a coil of wire will cause a voltage (emf) to be "induced" in the coil.
Correct, this can be represented mathematically;

[tex]V=\frac{\Delta\Phi}{\Delta t}=\frac{\Delta (BA)}{\Delta t}[/tex]

Next, what is ohm's law?
 
  • #10
Ohm's law states that, in an electrical circuit, the current passing through a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference applied across them provided all physical conditions are kept constant.
 
  • #11
cyprusx said:
Ohm's law states that, in an electrical circuit, the current passing through a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference applied across them provided all physical conditions are kept constant.
And mathematically;

[tex]I = \frac{V}{R}[/tex]

So, can you now combine the two equations?

As an aside, I do hope that you are taking the time to understand these laws and are simply not copying and pasting them directly from the internet.
 
  • #12
how do you comine them
 
  • #13
Substitute Faraday's law for the V in ohm's law.
 
  • #14
cant you help a guy out

Hootenanny I am studying for a test right now that's in an hour i really don't have time.
 
  • #15
I will do the substitution for you, however, you must draw your own conclusions. So now we can say that;

[tex]I = \frac{\frac{\Delta (BA)}{\Delta t}}{R} = \frac{\Delta (BA)}{R\cdot\Delta t}[/tex]

Now, if you change that rate at which you move the magnet through the coil, do any terms change in the above equation?
 
  • #16
yes they do
 
  • #17
cyprusx said:
yes they do
So does the current change?
 
  • #18
yes

so my initial question is False
 
  • #19
or...
 
  • #20
cyprusx said:
The magnitude of the current depends on the rate at which the magnet is moving in and out of the solenoid.
If the current does change when you change the rate at which the magnet moves then the above statement is ____
 
  • #21
true...
 
  • #22
cyprusx said:
true...

Sounds good to me :approve:
 
  • #23
Hootenanny does the magnitude of the current depend on the strength of the magnet.

P.S because weave formed such a close friendship over these past hours do you think you might be able to answer my other question... pleaseeeeee
 
  • #24
is this for real? you are studying for a test and can't combine 2 equations? is this grade 11 or something?
 
  • #25
yeah....
 
  • #26
cyprusx said:
Hootenanny does the magnitude of the current depend on the strength of the magnet.
What do you think? Look at the equation we derived above.
 

1. How does the movement of a magnet affect the magnitude of current?

The movement of a magnet can affect the magnitude of current by inducing an electromotive force (EMF) in a nearby conductor. This EMF causes the free electrons in the conductor to move, creating a flow of electrical current.

2. What is the relationship between magnet movement and current magnitude?

The relationship between magnet movement and current magnitude is directly proportional. This means that as the magnet moves faster or closer to the conductor, the magnitude of the current also increases.

3. Can the movement of a magnet create a current in a non-metallic material?

Yes, the movement of a magnet can create a current in a non-metallic material, as long as it is an electrical insulator that allows for the flow of electrons. This is known as electromagnetic induction.

4. How does the strength of a magnet affect the magnitude of current induced?

The strength of a magnet can affect the magnitude of current by increasing or decreasing the EMF induced in the conductor. A stronger magnet will generate a larger EMF and therefore a larger magnitude of current.

5. Is the direction of current induced by magnet movement always the same?

No, the direction of current induced by magnet movement can vary depending on the orientation of the magnet and the direction of its movement. The right-hand rule can be used to determine the direction of the induced current in relation to the direction of the magnetic field and the movement of the magnet.

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