Making a Difficult Decision: Risking it All for the Right Job

In summary, the individual had two job offers in the power sector that were deferred by 3 and 6 months. They went for another interview in a glass manufacturing company and were offered a job in plant maintenance, but declined it due to not wanting to work in that type of job. They are now considering writing a letter to the HR of the glass company to decline the offer and potentially taking a risk with another company or a 3 month project in a government research organization. They are also unsure about when the first company will send their joining letter and are weighing the options of job security or a better job profile. The conversation also touches on the idea of staying at a company for one's whole life or using it as a stepping stone.
  • #1
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During on campus interviews back in august, i got 2 jobs, both in power sector. And joining of both has been deferred now by 3 & 6 months. So i went for another interview yesterday in a glass manufacturing company(supposedly covering 70% market share in India). I got the job in plant maintenance, which at the time of interview I declined. I just don't want to go in plant maintenance type jobs, I already saw what its like in a power plant earlier.

Since the placement department of my college does not allow me any more chance(they allowed the 3rd one because of deferment of first 2), I can not have any more campus placements. There "might" be a campus visit of a company for mechanical engineering students on 8-9 may. And the glass guys ll be sending offer letter by 7 may. So I was thinking of writing a letter to HR of the glass company that i won't be able to join their company. Is it right to do so? If i don't make it in the next company, i do have a 3 month project in a government research organization, so its a sort of back up. Is it worth taking a risk? Also I am not sure of when the first company will send their joining letter

Obviously research guys will be paying far less than the company, but i don't want to have a maintenance engineer on my CV. I think I am being paranoid about it:cry:, but i dunno:confused:.

So the situation is: job as maintenance engineer from 1st July & job security OR an apology letter to glass company & another shot at the next company with a better job profile OR a 3 month project & hope for getting the job letter from Siemens?
 
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  • #2
It depends on if you have to put food on the table?
 
  • #3
nbo10 said:
It depends on if you have to put food on the table?
I don't have to.
then?:frown:
 
  • #4
I'm not entirely clear on why you think you are going to get an offer letter from the glass company since you already declined them in an interview.

I think you made a mistake in turning down an interested company, unless there are specific reasons which you did not mention- relocation, low salary, etc. "Not interesting" is more a reflection on you than the company. There's no rule that says you have to stay at the company your whole life, or even that you have to list the company on your CV. Once you have a job, you can make it whatever you want- a stepping stone to something better, or a timewaster.
 
  • #5
Andy Resnick said:
I'm not entirely clear on why you think you are going to get an offer letter from the glass company since you already declined them in an interview.
During interview, they asked if I am comfortable in plant maintenance, I said no. During the final interview with the MD, he said he is putting me in plant maintenance, in fact, there were 3 guys from mechanical & we all got the same profile.

I think you made a mistake in turning down an interested company, unless there are specific reasons which you did not mention- relocation, low salary, etc. "Not interesting" is more a reflection on you than the company.
I haven't turned it down yet. But the point is that it was more a step in desperation to get job secure. I was quite sure Siemens won't defer it, since Areva & Alstom already sent their joining letters. And since few companies were left, i just went with it, my mistake, I accept.
Salary isn't much different but location-yes, its 60kms away from my home, so I would have to relocate.

There's no rule that says you have to stay at the company your whole life, or even that you have to list the company on your CV. Once you have a job, you can make it whatever you want- a stepping stone to something better, or a timewaster.
Correct. I know:redface:

I think I will let the boat sail.
 

What are the potential risks of quitting a stable job for a new opportunity?

The potential risks of quitting a stable job for a new opportunity include financial instability, loss of benefits or job security, and potential failure to adapt to the new job or work environment.

How can one determine if a job is worth the risk?

One can determine if a job is worth the risk by evaluating the potential benefits, growth opportunities, and alignment with personal values and goals. It is also important to consider the level of passion and excitement for the new job, as well as the potential for long-term satisfaction.

What factors should be considered before making a difficult decision to leave a current job?

Factors that should be considered before making a difficult decision to leave a current job include the stability and satisfaction of the current job, personal and financial responsibilities, and potential impact on career growth and future opportunities.

How can one mitigate the risks of making a difficult decision to change jobs?

One can mitigate the risks of making a difficult decision to change jobs by thoroughly researching the new job and company, networking with professionals in the field, and seeking advice from mentors or career counselors. It is also important to have a backup plan in case the new job does not work out as expected.

What are some potential long-term benefits of taking a leap of faith and risking it all for the right job?

Some potential long-term benefits of taking a leap of faith and risking it all for the right job include career advancement, personal growth and development, and increased job satisfaction and happiness. It can also open up new opportunities and allow for a more fulfilling career path in the long run.

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