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Mathematical Methods/Classical Mechanics

  1. Jun 7, 2008 #1

    I wanted some suggestions on a rigorous textbook for a Mathematical Methods course (which at my college) is taken after a one-semester (Differential Equations based) Modern Physics course in the sophomore year. Basically, I am looking for textbook suggestions that are considered "standard" and rigorous for a Mathematical Methods course for a physics major.

    Additionally, I would also like suggestions for a "standard" and rigorous textbook for a junior level classical mehanics course. Personally, I'd like to find a textbook that is as rigorous for junior level Classical Mechanics as Griffith's Introduction to Electrodynamics is for junior level Classical Electricity & Magnetism.

    Suggestions are appreciated.


  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 9, 2008 #2

    George Jones

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    Mathematical Methods In the Physical Sciences by Boas is a standard text for junior-level mathematical methods. Mathematical Methods for Physicists by Arfken and Weber is a standard text for grad-level (or possibly senior-level) mathematical methods, but, at this level, I much prefer Mathematical Physics by Hassani. Recently, I have been looking at Mathematics for Physics & Physicists by Appel, which has some (but not total) overlap with traditional mathematical methods texts, but which treats the mathematics somewhat more honestly than traditional texts.
  4. Jun 9, 2008 #3
    Greg Bernhardt posted a link to lecture notes that are freely available in the Advanced Physics Learning Materials forum. I'm not sure whether they fit your needs, but if not, you might use them to define what you are looking for, like "I'm missing treatment of ..... there" or "Its too rigorous / not rigorous enough". So here it is, about 3MB (pdf):


    If you have a slow internet connection, you might prefer to follow this link and have a look at the individual chapters of the lecture notes in HTML format to see if you like it:


    (it seems to be the same stuff, but I'm not sure whether the versions are really identical or whether they slightly differ)
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2008
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