Mechanical Resonance: Typical Frequency Ranges

In summary, the resonant frequency of a mechanical system is specific to that system and is influenced by various parameters. It is impossible to give a frequency range for a general mechanical system, but nanomechanical resonators can have frequencies in the tens of MHz range while large structures can have frequencies lower than 0.1 Hz. The resonance is usually broad and there can be multiple resonances for different modes.
  • #1
GT1
129
0
Is there any typical frequencies range which mechanical systems resonant at ?
 
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  • #2
Yea, its natural frequency.
 
  • #3
jasc15 said:
Yea, its natural frequency.

So what is the frequencies range ?
 
  • #4
GT1 said:
So what is the frequencies range ?
It is impossible to give a frequency range for a general mechanical system since the resonant frequency is specific to a particular mechanical system and is dependent on a large number of parameters.
 
  • #5
Hootenanny said:
It is impossible to give a frequency range for a general mechanical system since the resonant frequency is specific to a particular mechanical system and is dependent on a large number of parameters.

I can't imagine mechanical system resonant at frequencies of GHz, But i can imagine electrical systems resonant at frequencies of MHz for example.
So there is no order of magnitude for it?
 
  • #6
Well, 1-100,000 is five orders of magnitude, but there is probably an upper limit based on materials properties. Amplitude has to go down as frequency goes up to avoid having the inertial forces tear apart the object or device.

The equation for natural frequency is w^2=k/m
 
  • #7
Nanomechanical resonators can have a resonance frequency of tens of MHz, large structures (buildings etc) less than 0.1 Hz.

So the "typical " frequency range for mechanical resonance covers at least 8 orders of magnitude.
 
  • #8
f95toli said:
Nanomechanical resonators can have a resonance frequency of tens of MHz, large structures (buildings etc) less than 0.1 Hz.

So the "typical " frequency range for mechanical resonance covers at least 8 orders of magnitude.

Plus the (primary) resonance is usually quite broad due to dissipative processes. And there will be multiple resonances for different modes- compression, torsion, different axes, differences depending on where the exciter is and what direction it's operating.. on and on and on...
 

Related to Mechanical Resonance: Typical Frequency Ranges

1. What is mechanical resonance?

Mechanical resonance refers to the phenomenon where an object or system vibrates with a higher amplitude at a specific frequency. This frequency is known as the resonant frequency and is determined by the object's physical properties.

2. What are the typical frequency ranges for mechanical resonance?

The frequency range for mechanical resonance is typically between 1 Hz to 20 kHz. However, this can vary depending on the specific object or system and its physical properties.

3. How does mechanical resonance occur?

Mechanical resonance occurs when an external force is applied to an object or system at its resonant frequency. This force causes the object to vibrate with a higher amplitude, resulting in an increase in energy and potentially causing damage.

4. What are some examples of mechanical resonance?

Some common examples of mechanical resonance include a swing set, a tuning fork, and a wine glass being shattered by a singer's voice. In each of these examples, the object is being forced to vibrate at its resonant frequency, resulting in a strong response.

5. How can mechanical resonance be controlled or avoided?

Mechanical resonance can be controlled or avoided by changing the object's physical properties, such as its shape, size, or material. Dampening materials can also be used to absorb the energy and reduce the amplitude of vibrations. Additionally, avoiding using external forces at the resonant frequency can also prevent mechanical resonance from occurring.

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