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Mechanics of electric motor to drive shaft by chain drive

  1. Jul 2, 2014 #1
    Hi! I would like to change my work truck into an electric hybrid. I have all the electrical portions of this project handled. My big problem is somehow connecting the motor to the drive shaft. The motor is going to sit in the bed of the truck. Its a twelve foot box truck, the motor will sit toward the front on the floor center and angled the same pitch as the drive shaft with holes cut through the floor for the chain, or gear box or??? The electric motor will be between three to six hundred horse power with a max of 600ft lbs of torque which is only an additional two hundred ft lbs of torque from the v10 engine.
    Occasionally if I get excited, I will apply all power from gas engine and electric motor for a total max of about 900 horse power and 1000 ft lbs of torque. Will I blow out the rear end? or differential? Will the drive shaft snap off at the differential connection?
    I'm sorry I am clueless about the mechanical engineering side of things, electrical no problem.
    Maybe I am approaching this totally wrong, maybe there is some better idea of attaching an additional mechanical drive to the drive shaft. Any Ideas?
    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 3, 2014 #2

    SteamKing

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    This is a good enough reason to stop this project before you ruin your truck and a lot of electrical parts, to boot.

    If the bed of your truck is going to be occupied by a large electric motor, what's the point?
     
  4. Jul 3, 2014 #3
    Funny! You must have missed the 12 ft box part.. This motor will only occupy the front center 25% which is never used anyway except for a small refrigerator keeping my food and drinks ice cold.

    Most of my tools and inventory are on the outside doors. This is a "spartan body" By the way, how am I going to ruin a lot of electrical parts?

    << Insults removed by Moderator >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 3, 2014
  5. Jul 3, 2014 #4

    SteamKing

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    I still don't see what your point is. What powers this 600 HP electric motor?

    One type of hybrid drivetrain is that the vehicle is driven by the electric motor, which takes current from a battery. When the charge in the battery gets below a certain point, a small IC engine starts up, which in turn drives a generator to re-charge the battery. And that's just one type of hybrid configuration; there are others, as described here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_vehicle

    You seem to think that you can operate the V10 engine and the electric motor simultaneously and get the combined power output from both. That's not going to happen unless you have a massive battery capable of supplying enough current to run the electric motor while the V10 engine is also running. When the battery runs out of charge, you're going to be left with a conventional truck carrying around a lot of dead weight.
     
  6. Jul 3, 2014 #5
    Remember, the electrical portion of this project is handled and under control, nevertheless, I will go ahead and fill you in. Inside the truck are unused shelves that will house stacks of battery packs for a 480v 3 phase dual and independent banks for each motor because electric motors will be mechanically piggy backed.

    This is a parallel hybrid. Lets not forget about regenerating power from both motors. These battery packs will be plugged in at night at 240v for full recharge and considering solar panels for roof once I do the calculations to see if the solar panels are a waist of time or not. I have a lot of options at job sites of tapping into 240v circuits to charge up at stops making an avg of 100miles a day into divisions which so far looks electrically doable. Im figuring .5 miles/kWh of battery with a combined total of 50 to start with room for more. This will only be used for acceleration and regen breaking.

    Im just stuck on the mechanical part, but what I think I am going to do is have a couple of new cross members installed and shorten the drive shaft and run these motors right out of the transmission and then connect drive shaft to end of motors rather than having a motor mounted in the back of the truck with a chain or something to the drive axle. I may lose some horse power and torque, but that will just give me more distance with the same battery packs. Maybe I can fit three motors, the drive shaft I think is about six feet long.

    Unless of course I hear of a good idea of how to link the motor to the drive shaft from inside the bed of the truck, then I won't have to sacrifice any horse power or torque.

    I should have supplied more information at the beginning, thanks for your help.
     
  7. Jul 3, 2014 #6
    The truck box is connected to the spring and shock suspension. The driveshaft would be not. Have you given any thought as to how this affects the chain tension?
     
  8. Jul 3, 2014 #7

    berkeman

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    Thread locked for Moderation...
     
  9. Jul 3, 2014 #8

    berkeman

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    Thread will remain closed. This is way to dangerous of a project, in so many ways.
     
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