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Missing Hydrogen in DNA base pairs

  1. Mar 21, 2017 #1
    The question: What happens to the extra hydrogen when the base pairs combine?

    For example the formula for Adenine and Thymine are C5H5N5 & C5H6N2O2. So when combined there should be 11 hydrogen, however in the diagrams for A and T when together only show H9. 2 off. Same with G and C, C5H5N5O & C4H5N3O. There should be 10 hydrogen total, but the diagram shows 8. 2 off. What concept am I missing?

    Thank you!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 21, 2017 #2

    DrClaude

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    Staff: Mentor

    Look up the molecules and figure out which hydrogens are missing. Can you see what has replaced H in the figure you posted?
     
  4. Mar 21, 2017 #3
    I think I see what you are saying... The missing H's are replaced with what looks like ( C1' ) ? Don't know what that stands for though...They are located in the lower right and left of each diagram. Am I on the right track? So would those symbols represent where they bond to the sugar phosphate backbone of the DNA strand?
     
  5. Mar 21, 2017 #4

    DrClaude

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    Staff: Mentor

    Correct. Have a look at this picture in Wikipedia, where you see also the backbone: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA#/media/File:DNA_chemical_structure.svg
     
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