Missing Hydrogen in DNA base pairs

In summary, the conversation discusses the question of what happens to the extra hydrogen when base pairs combine. The formula for Adenine and Thymine suggests there should be 11 hydrogen, but diagrams show only 9. Similarly, the formula for Guanine and Cytosine suggests 10 hydrogen, but diagrams show only 8. The missing hydrogens are replaced with symbols representing where they bond to the sugar phosphate backbone of the DNA strand. This is shown in a picture on Wikipedia.
  • #1
Scienceklutz
3
0
The question: What happens to the extra hydrogen when the base pairs combine?

For example the formula for Adenine and Thymine are C5H5N5 & C5H6N2O2. So when combined there should be 11 hydrogen, however in the diagrams for A and T when together only show H9. 2 off. Same with G and C, C5H5N5O & C4H5N3O. There should be 10 hydrogen total, but the diagram shows 8. 2 off. What concept am I missing?

Thank you!
 

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  • #2
Look up the molecules and figure out which hydrogens are missing. Can you see what has replaced H in the figure you posted?
 
  • #3
I think I see what you are saying... The missing H's are replaced with what looks like ( C1' ) ? Don't know what that stands for though...They are located in the lower right and left of each diagram. Am I on the right track? So would those symbols represent where they bond to the sugar phosphate backbone of the DNA strand?
 
  • #4
Scienceklutz said:
I think I see what you are saying... The missing H's are replaced with what looks like ( C1' ) ? Don't know what that stands for though...They are located in the lower right and left of each diagram. Am I on the right track? So would those symbols represent where they bond to the sugar phosphate backbone of the DNA strand?
Correct. Have a look at this picture in Wikipedia, where you see also the backbone: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA#/media/File:DNA_chemical_structure.svg
 

Related to Missing Hydrogen in DNA base pairs

1. What is missing hydrogen in DNA base pairs?

Missing hydrogen in DNA base pairs refers to the absence of a hydrogen bond between two complementary nitrogenous bases (adenine and thymine, or guanine and cytosine) in the double helix structure of DNA.

2. How does missing hydrogen in DNA base pairs affect DNA structure?

The missing hydrogen bond leads to a weaker bond between the two strands of DNA, which can cause instability in the structure and potential errors during DNA replication.

3. What causes the hydrogen bond to be missing in DNA base pairs?

The hydrogen bond can be missing due to mutations or chemical modifications in the nitrogenous bases, as well as environmental factors such as exposure to UV radiation or certain chemicals.

4. Can missing hydrogen in DNA base pairs lead to genetic disorders?

Yes, missing hydrogen in DNA base pairs can cause mutations and errors in DNA replication, which can lead to genetic disorders and diseases such as cancer.

5. How is missing hydrogen in DNA base pairs being studied and addressed?

Scientists are studying the effects of missing hydrogen in DNA base pairs through experiments and simulations, and are also exploring potential ways to repair or prevent these errors from occurring.

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