Most commonly misspelled science and math words

  • #71
Orodruin
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Although 'k' for kilo is the SI standard, more often than not, KBaud, Kbit, and Kbytes are more often 'K' than 'k'.
1 kbit = 1000 bit
1 Kbit = 1024 bit
The latter not being SI standard but JEDEC standard iirc.
 
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  • #72
Baluncore
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A scientific and technical spell checker should detect incomplete units.
"gallon" or "gal " should not pass. Use gal(US) or gal(imp).
"ton " should not pass. Use ton(short), ton(long), or metric "tonne", which is 1000 kg.
 
  • #73
Baluncore
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Are malapropisms classed as spelling errors ?
“To be pacific”, is commonly replacing "to be specific".
January should be followed by February, not Febuary.
Then hydroscopic instruments are used to look into deep water, while hygroscopic materials take up moisture from the atmosphere.
People now “hone in”, where I would “home in”. I use hone while fine finishing surfaces or cutting edges.
There is a minuscule problem with miniscule.
 
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  • #74
Svein
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And the common mistake "Wein.bridge" (wine-bridge) which should of course be Wien bridge.
To be precise: Wien is the correct name of the city of Vienna, Wein is wine.
And another: The Norwegian word "malstrøm" (meaning grind-stream) is almost always miswritten as "maelstrom" (which would be "mælstrøm" which is meaningless). What is it with the English and diphtongs?
 
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  • #75
Baluncore
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What is it with the English and diphtongs?
I assume you meant diphthongs.
 
  • #76
Orodruin
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What is it with the English and diphtongs?
They probably discussed it over a nice smouergeausbeurd.
Actually… that’s probably just Scanian accent …
 
  • #77
Svein
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I assume you meant diphthongs.
Of course - I have never seen it spelled in English and the spellchecker did not react.

By the way - the Norwegian/Danish "ø" is the same letter and sound as the "ö" and is pronounced as the vowel sound in "first".

smouergeausbeurd
That is a Swedish expression and is written "smörgåsbord". I do not know the English equivalent - it translates sloppily as "sandwich-table" (not a table made of sandwiches, but a serving-table with all kinds of sandwiches).
Actually, English has lots of words with Scandinavian roots - check out .
 
  • #78
topsquark
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And the common mistake "Wein.bridge" (wine-bridge) which should of course be Wien bridge.
To be precise: Wien is the correct name of the city of Vienna, Wein is wine.
And another: The Norwegian word "malstrøm" (meaning grind-stream) is almost always miswritten as "maelstrom" (which would be "mælstrøm" which is meaningless). What is it with the English and diphtongs?
Actually, maelstrom is the accepted English spelling. I don't know why as the a shouldn't have been translated to an æ. Butthe English speakers aren't wrong, the lexicographers were! :cool:

-Dan
 
  • #79
DrGreg
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Actually, maelstrom is the accepted English spelling. I don't know why as the a shouldn't have been translated to an æ. Butthe English speakers aren't wrong, the lexicographers were! :cool:
But English-language lexicographers don't invent spellings and meanings of words; they observe and record how words are already being used in the real English-speaking world. So if sufficient numbers of people use a "wrong" spelling, the wrong spelling becomes right.
 
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  • #80
Orodruin
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That is a Swedish expression and is written "smörgåsbord". I do not know the English equivalent - it translates sloppily as "sandwich-table" (not a table made of sandwiches, but a serving-table with all kinds of sandwiches).
Actually, English has lots of words with Scandinavian roots - check out .

I am aware. I am Swedish.
The word itself (ö and å replaced by o and a) is actually the correct English and an excellent example of a word borrowed from Swedish to English.
 
  • #81
Orodruin
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Wiktionary claims the English word maelstrom originates in old Dutch word maelstroom (modern Dutch being maalstroom). The exact relation to the Nordic version is not discussed but likely of common origin.
 
  • #82
fresh_42
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The german version Mahlstrom (sometimes Malstrom) means vortex and comes from the dutch word maalstrom (malen = drehen = turning).
 
  • #83
Baluncore
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Another malapropism.
For all intents and purposes is becoming for all intensive purposes.
 
  • #84
Klystron
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...
That is a Swedish expression and is written "smörgåsbord". I do not know the English equivalent ...

A common North American English equivalent buffet likely derives from French. A buffet features a variety of self-serve dishes sometimes anchored by a chef slicing roast meats. Participants serve themselves from hot and cold trays arranged in lines, juggling warmed or chilled plates, able to call out delectable choices to acquaintances.

My adopted home state of Nevada transforms this cafeteria experience into an extravaganza of excess, raising smörgåsbord to high art with certain hot dishes made to order by sous-chefs and icy cold desserts compiled by a friendly confectioner. Notwithstanding this interesting variety, even pre-pandemic, I prefer restaurants that bring food and drinks to guests at their table to balancing loaded plates from buffet line to table and back again.

The first smörgåsbord restaurant my family frequented in the then tiny town of Cupertino CA named "Fiords" featured Scandanavian folk music and dancing on holidays amid tasty 'family' foods.
 
  • #87
martinbn
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" In a lecture series on approximation theory, Besicovitch announced, "zere is no 't' in ze name Chebysov" (P. Chebychev, 1821-1894). Two weeks later he said, "Ve now introduce ze class of T-polynomials. They are called T-polynomials because T is ze first letter of ze name Chebyshov."
 

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