Movie Classics that totally escape me

  • Thread starter Bystander
  • Start date

Klystron

Gold Member
479
516
Aside from the beach sex scene and some memory of bullying in the ranks, I only remember the fantastic horn solos in "From Here to Eternity". Based on this discussion I will watch it again, probably on TCM. Thanks for the heads up.
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
Interestingly, there are fans of the books which are also fans of the movies.
There is a saying that goes:
"You can please some of the people all of the time, you can please all of the people some of the time, but you cannot please all of the people all of the time.

Replace "people" with "fans" and you'd probably have to rewrite it to :
"You can please some of the fans some of the time, but you cannot please some of the fans all of the time, or please all of the fans some of the time, and definitely not all the fans all of the time."
People who think it was great and claim they read and understood the book did not get the book.
 
Movie classics I do enjoy:
  • Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
    Cool story, cool setting. I was pleasantly surprised by the movie.
I enjoyed the familiar quotes, and the movie was entertaining :film:
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
I enjoyed the familiar quotes, and the movie was entertaining :film:
Another film not to watch drunk and blue, it is the epitome of romance and personal sacrifices for love.
Apparently he does not say, 'play it again Sam!'

I think he says, 'play it!' And 'if if she can hear it so can i.'

In my top 20
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
Remains of the day, passage to India and Gandhi did not floor me. Perhaps I need to rewatch.

Biko if you have not seen it is amazing. Great performance from Denzel Washington and John Thaw
 

Klystron

Gold Member
479
516
Another film not to watch drunk and blue, it is the epitome of romance and personal sacrifices for love.
Apparently he does not say, 'play it again Sam!'

I think he says, 'play it!' And 'if if she can hear it so can i.'

In my top 20
I watched a 'director's cut' many years ago at a Bogie revival in SF. True, Bogie never says "Play it again, Sam.". Ilsa asks Sam to play "As Time Goes By" as in the old days not knowing Rick forbids it. Rick is flabbergasted to hear the song and to see Ilsa as if she materialized from the music Rick has forbidden Sam to play. In the revival version without sub-titles I thought Rick later says to Sam about Ilsa and "As Time Goes By",

"You played it for her. Now play it for me. Play it, Sam." Then the dialog you remember.

The idea is that 'all bets are off' at Rick's Casablanca Casino; standing rules no longer apply. Rick drinks with customers. French loyalists out sing the Waffen SS. Bulgarian refugees win big money on a gaffed (rigged) table. With Ilsa standing there in the flesh, a forbidden song is not going to remind Rick of happier days in pre-war Paris. He has found his "Object of Desire", or she has found him. What will he do with her?
 
Last edited:

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
I watched a 'director's cut' many years ago at a Bogie revival in SF. True, Bogie never says "Play it again, Sam.". Ilsa asks Sam to play "As Time Goes By" as in the old days not knowing Rick forbids it. Rick is flabbergasted to hear the song and to see Ilsa as if she materialized from the music Rick has forbidden Sam to play. In the revival version without sub-titles I thought Rick later says to Sam about Ilsa and "As Time Goes By",

"You played it for her. Now play it for me. Play it, Sam." Then the dialog you remember.

The idea is that 'all bets are off' at Rick's Casablanca Casino; standing rules no longer apply. Rick drinks with customers. French loyalists out sing the Waffen SS. Bulgarian refugees win big money on a gaffed (rigged) table. With Ilsa standing there in the flesh, a forbidden song is not going to remind Rick of happier days in pre-war Paris. He has found his "Object of Desire", or she has found him. What will he do with her?
There are some great lines and scenes.

Ilsa: I wasn't sure you were the same. Let's see, the last time we met was...
Rick: La Belle Aurore.
Ilsa: How nice, you remembered. But of course, that was the day the Germans marched into Paris.
Rick: Not an easy day to forget.
Ilsa: No.
Rick: I remember every detail. The Germans wore gray, you wore blue.
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
I watched the big sleep twice and got bored/lost twice, it is 39 on rotten tomatoes.

The only thing I remember was how far apart Lauren Bacall ‘s eyes were, I could not decide whether she was unusually striking or just unusual.
 

Klystron

Gold Member
479
516
I watched the big sleep twice and got bored/lost twice, it is 39 on rotten tomatoes.

The only thing I remember was how far apart Lauren Bacall ‘s eyes were, I could not decide whether she was unusually striking or just unusual.
Consider the source. I guess Raymond Chandler was 'popular'. Get past the 'nekkid ladies' and obvious plot twists, there is no substance. Chandler is a pale imitation of Jim Thompson and Dashiel Hammett. In comic book terminology Sam Spade could kick Phillip Marlowe's bootee.

For Bacall at her best I recommend "Have and Have Not" and "Key Largo". Young Lauren Bacall on her own in Martinique teamed with Hoagy Carmichael on the piano sends Bogie and Brennan into a tizzy. If "Have" was Pappa Hemingway's weakest novel, it shows how a good writer towers over the mediocre, drunk on a bad day.

"Key Largo" was adapted from a play and retains the claustrophobic confines of the stage, even on the open water -- the boat is tiny and the weather cloudy after the hurricane. Much of the dialog is whispered or talked over, one-sided over telephones; not unlike real life. Bacall looks more mature, thin and elegant, the model of how she appears for the rest of her long career.

[Edit: removed mistaken section on Chandler. From memory must have mixed up authors in a genre I rarely read. Thanks @PeroK ]
 
Last edited:
1,320
2,505
The idea is that 'all bets are off' at Rick's Casablanca Casino; standing rules no longer apply. Rick drinks with customers. French loyalists out sing the Waffen SS. Bulgarian refugees win big money on a gaffed (rigged) table. With Ilsa standing there in the flesh, a forbidden song is not going to remind Rick of happier days in pre-war Paris. He has found his "Object of Desire", or she has found him. What will he do with her?
You remember well.

"The idea is that 'all bets are off' at Rick's Casablanca Casino"
I think that is also a good description of the movie itself for a person who has not seen it. There are quite many characters whose motivations, choices and destinies hang in the balance in the movie, and some until the very end. All this I think add to making it a very interesting and multifaceted story:

(Spoiler warning! Please do not read the spoilers below if you want to see the movie with a fresh, open mind!)

First of all, Rick Blaine, of course. He had been helping underdogs against fascists before, but became disillusioned and cynical after Paris, when the Germans arrived and he lost Ilsa. Now he appears selfish and coldhearted, but some characters in the movie do not believe he really is, and it turns out they are correct. And this is evident when he helps the Bulgarian refugees very selflessly.

But what he will do regarding his love interest is still uncertain. He knows how he felt after he lost Ilsa, and if he chooses to go between Victor Laszlo and Ilsa, he knows that he might make Laszlo disillusioned and thus severely injure one of the most important resistance leaders. What will he do? Choose selfish love or choose the greater good?

Ilsa Lund is also herself caught in a dilemma, between two love interests.

Captain Louis Renault is very much an opportunist with few scruples, and it is uncertain throughout the movie if he is a complete turncoat or not. This makes him a very interesting and important character in the movie, as there is no way of being sure of what he will do. Yet he seems to have some emotional connection to Rick. But it is not until the very end we get to know what Renault chooses. The very last scene of the movie is Rick and Renault walking away together, when both of them seem to have decided to join the fight again.

Signor Ferrari, who owns the Blue Parrot, is Rick's competitor, and he also seems to be a shady character with unknown motivations except for that of making money.

The fate of Rick's Café Américain, which is part a gambling den, also hangs in the balance throughout the movie. Ferrari wants to buy Rick's cafe, and when he is turned down, he tries to get Sam, the piano player, to work at his place. The café is also the central place of various drama, and later, Rick's place finally gets shut down. Rick finally sells it, while making sure that his former employees stay employed there.

Last, but not least, there are many clever and fun dialogues in the movie, like when Renault asks Rick why he is in Casablanca:

Renault: "What in heaven’s name brought you to Casablanca?"
Rick: "My health, I came to Casablanca for the waters."
Renault: "The waters? What waters? We’re in the desert."
Rick: "I was misinformed."

All in all very enjoyable, in my opinion :smile:.
 
Last edited:

DaveC426913

Gold Member
18,196
1,803
Thanks Dennis for that insight. I had never watched the film with an eye to the larger picture of the war and Rick's history with it. It sure puts a whole different spin on that last line by Renault.

I can't wait for the sequel. Hopefully they'll show how Louis went from being a police captain to an automobile magnate.
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
You remember well.


I think that is also a good description of the movie itself for a person who has not seen it. There are quite many characters whose motivations, choices and destinies hang in the balance in the movie, and some until the very end. All this I think add to making it a very interesting and multifaceted story:

(Spoiler warning! Please do not read the spoilers below if you want to see the movie with a fresh, open mind!)

First of all, Rick Blaine, of course. He had been helping underdogs against fascists before, but became disillusioned and cynical after Paris, when the Germans arrived and he lost Ilsa. Now he appears selfish and coldhearted, but some characters in the movie do not believe he really is, and it turns out they are correct. And this is evident when he helps the Bulgarian refugees very selflessly.

But what he will do regarding his love interest is still uncertain. He knows how he felt after he lost Ilsa, and if he chooses to go between Victor Laszlo and Ilsa, he knows that he might make Laszlo disillusioned and thus severely injure one of the most important resistance leaders. What will he do? Choose selfish love or choose the greater good?

Ilsa Lund is also herself caught in a dilemma, between two love interests.

Captain Louis Renault is very much an opportunist with few scruples, and it is uncertain throughout the movie if he is a complete turncoat or not. This makes him a very interesting and important character in the movie, as there is no way of being sure of what he will do. Yet he seems to have some emotional connection to Rick. But it is not until the very end we get to know what Renault chooses. The very last scene of the movie is Rick and Renault walking away together, when both of them seem to have decided to join the fight again.

Signor Ferrari, who owns the Blue Parrot is Rick's competitor, and he also seems to be a shady character with unknown motivations except for that of making money.

The fate of Rick's Café Américain, which is part a gambling den, also hangs in the balance throughout the movie. Ferrari wants to buy Rick's cafe, and when he is turned down, he tries to get Sam, the piano player, to work at his place. The café is also the central place of various drama, and later, Rick's place finally gets shut down. Rick finally sells it, while making sure that his former employees stay employed there.

Last, but not least, there are many clever and fun dialogues in the movie, like when Renault asks Rick why he is in Casablanca:

Renault: "What in heaven’s name brought you to Casablanca?"
Rick: "My health, I came to Casablanca for the waters."
Renault: "The waters? What waters? We’re in the desert."
Rick: "I was misinformed."

All in all very enjoyable, in my opinion :smile:.
Brilliant, however.
I am getting conscious this is starting to get a little Casablancacentric so..
I am going through various lists to see if there are any other major disappointing ones
 
1,320
2,505
Thanks Dennis for that insight. I had never watched the film with an eye to the larger picture of the war and Rick's history with it. It sure puts a whole different spin on that last line by Renault.
Thanks, the movie was quite fresh in my mind since I saw it just a couple of days ago, and my impression of it was a bit different and more detailed than the first time I saw it.

I am getting conscious this is starting to get a little Casablancacentric so..
I will do so too :smile:.
 

PeroK

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
2018 Award
9,676
3,581
I watched the big sleep twice and got bored/lost twice, it is 39 on rotten tomatoes.

The only thing I remember was how far apart Lauren Bacall ‘s eyes were, I could not decide whether she was unusually striking or just unusual.
The plot of the film of The Big Sleep is somewhat simplified from that of the book.
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
The plot of the film of The Big Sleep is somewhat simplified from that of the book.
I was somewhat distracted both times but yes I got lost
 

PeroK

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
2018 Award
9,676
3,581
Consider the source. I guess Raymond Chandler was 'popular'. Get past the 'nekkid ladies' and obvious plot twists, there is no substance. Chandler is a pale imitation of Jim Thompson and Dashiel Hammett.
Chandler pre-dates Thompson, so cannot be an imitation.

I prefer Chandler to Hammett. Funnily enough, for the reasons you gave, except that I found Hammett lacked substance. Marlowe seems to me at least a more complex character than Spade.
 

Klystron

Gold Member
479
516
Chandler pre-dates Thompson, so cannot be an imitation.

I prefer Chandler to Hammett. Funnily enough, for the reasons you gave, except that I found Hammett lacked substance. Marlowe seems to me at least a more complex character than Spade.
I confess to rarely reading old time 'detetctive' now mystery genre novels. I only meant to comment on source material as differentiating 'classic' movies with similar actors. I read Hammett when he was assigned by uni English teachers as a local San Francisco (Bay Area) author. In a related Film Studies class we visited scenes from Hammett's novels and films adapted from his work and also a street named for him.

I got interested in Thompson after seeing movies adapted from his novels such as "Farewell, My Lovely", the many versions of "The Getaway", "After Dark, My Sweet" and the brilliant film "The Grifters". After researching Thompson on wikipedia I see he is a post WWII author. I must have mixed him up with Depression-era writers, probably William Lindsay Gresham.
 
I watched the big sleep twice and got bored/lost twice, it is 39 on rotten tomatoes.

The only thing I remember was how far apart Lauren Bacall ‘s eyes were, I could not decide whether she was unusually striking or just unusual.
pinball1970 lol she does have wide set eyes 👀 by the way do you remember which episode in season 6 of House with JS Bach cello piece thank you
 
1,320
2,505
There is an ET rip off I want to see and also Water world
It was a long time ago I saw Waterworld, and I remember that...
(No story spoilers below, but I put my thoughts in a spoiler to not taint the view of someone who has not seen it)
...I had mixed feelings about it. It had quite good potential, a decent story and if I remember correctly there were some cool things in it. But it somehow failed to reach its full potential, but I don't remember why. Maybe there were too many silly things in it.

And to be blunt and short, it's sort of a Mad Max 2 on water. Which could have worked.
 
1,320
2,505
I found another list on Rotten Tomatoes:

http://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/guide/100-best-classic-movies/

It included movies that weren't on the other list I posted.
Please note that the films are spread out on 5 different pages.
I didn't find any movie there I did not like, but most of them I have not seen.
Maybe there are movies on that list other PF:ers have opinions about, or gets a desire to see...
 

DaveC426913

Gold Member
18,196
1,803

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
pinball1970 lol she does have wide set eyes 👀 by the way do you remember which episode in season 6 of House with JS Bach cello piece thank you
I think it's either season 6 or 7

Here is the scene so care if you want to watch from scratch. SPOILER!
 

OCR

780
618
. . .do you remember which episode in season 6 of House with JS Bach cello piece. . .

The episode was a two-part season premiere titled. . . Broken .

The cellist, "Silent Girl" was. . . Ana Lenchantin .



Lol. . . My wife and I were very dedicated viewers 👀 of House . . . . 😉

.
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
545
474
The episode was a two-part season premiere titled. . . Broken .

The cellist, "Silent Girl" was. . . Ana Lenchantin .



Lol. . . My wife and I were very dedicated viewers 👀 of House . . . . 😉

.
The best series ever, made completely by Hugh Laurie's character. Genius acting
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: OCR

Want to reply to this thread?

"Movie Classics that totally escape me" You must log in or register to reply here.

Related Threads for: Movie Classics that totally escape me

  • Posted
2 3 4
Replies
89
Views
12K
Replies
20
Views
3K
  • Posted
2
Replies
38
Views
3K
  • Posted
2
Replies
28
Views
3K
  • Posted
Replies
12
Views
4K
  • Posted
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Posted
Replies
19
Views
5K
  • Posted
2
Replies
36
Views
3K

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving

Hot Threads

Top