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Moving from Physics (BA) to Engineering (ME)

  1. Aug 3, 2009 #1
    I just graduated with a BA in Physics. Next year (Fall 2010) I want to start graduate school for engineering. However, I'm not sure what type of engineering I want to get a degree in (though I do know that I'm not interested in material science).

    I'm currently living in Atlanta, and I figured that I would take something like Engineering 101 and then decide where to apply. Unfortunately, I don't seem to know enough about engineering to even find an engineering 101 course. As in, they're not called engineering 101.

    I'm looking for an overview to engineering: hopefully something similar to Psych 101 in that it touches briefly on just about everything in the field. What would a course like that be called?

    Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 3, 2009 #2
    A course surveying the different engineering fields is not necessary. There are plenty of resources available to you outside of academia. Why don't you try searching online, or speaking with some engineers, students or advisors about the nature of their work? What field of physics most interests you? You could look at course descriptions for each field at the university you plan to attend. This should give you an idea of what your studies will be like.

    http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos027.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  4. Aug 3, 2009 #3
    Wow. That list of engineering disciplines is perfect. Thank you so much.

    I've spoken to quite a few engineers, and it sounds like I'd like aerospace, mechanical, civil, though there are others that may be great as well.

    Now that you mention it, a course probably wouldn't help all that much: from taking first year physics and then chemistry, I thought I wanted to be a materials scientist hands-down. Then I did carbon nanotube research in a materials scienc lab for a year and changed my mind completely.

    Do you have any advice for applying to engineering program without any formal engineering background?
     
  5. Jan 20, 2010 #4
    i also would like to know
     
  6. Jan 20, 2010 #5
    Hey, creepypasta!
    I just finished applying to the electrical engineering department at GA Tech. Dunno if I got in yet, but I think it for sure helps that I got a part-time job this year in one of their labs.
    Good luck!
     
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