Multiple physics and maths courses at the same time?

In summary, the conversation discusses the speaker's concerns about taking multiple math and physics courses in one semester. They mention that their university follows a split semester schedule and outlines the courses they plan to take in each period. The speaker expresses their doubts about their ability to handle the workload and the potential for three exams within a week. They also consider the option of taking the modern physics course later and mention their previous struggles with balancing work and coursework. Ultimately, they decide to give it a shot but acknowledge the importance of not overloading themselves and maintaining a healthy balance. They also mention that they will have a lighter workload in the months leading up to this semester, which will allow them to prepare for the more challenging courses.
  • #1
Bobman
15
6
So we are to choose electives (this is all undergrad) for the spring in about a month or so, and i am having doubts if i might end up taking one "math heavy" or "concept heavy" course too many.

My uni splits one semester into two periods, meaning the spring semester is based on two periods.

The would be schedule for period 1:
  • AC Circuits analysis course (fourier analysis, complex power, three phase power, kirchhoffs laws and norton-thevenin in circuits with inductors, capacitors etc)
  • A probability and statistics course (which is important for the thermodynamics and stat phys course)
  • First part of a "Modern physics" course (special relativity and quantum mechanics) No exam this period.
  • A course where we learn to write scientific papers (It doesn't take much time at all)
The would be schedule for period 2:
  • A discrete time signal course (a lot of differential equations, transforms and so on)
  • "Thermodynamics and statistical physics" (1rst and 2nd thermo laws, entropy, Carnots theorem, partition function, state density, Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac and Maxwell-Boltzmann's distributions etc)
  • Last part of the "Modern physics" course (pretty much vibrations and rotations in molecules, atomic nucleus and radioactivity). This is also where the exam is.
  • The scientific papers course (again not very demanding at all)
When i asked the professors about the course two physics courses, the modern physics prof said the "worst" part will be in the first period and the thermodynamics prof says students usually find the course to be quite difficult. But at least the courses more difficult parts won't collide it seems. I am unable to ask any senior students on their opinions of the courses.

So what do i think about all this? The uni usually only schedule two math based courses at the same time, probably for a reason. Historically I've judged my study ability quite accurately, and i feel like this is doable, specially since i view the two physics courses as part of the "highlight" in my undergrad curriculum, thus being more motivated to study them. I generally regret not trying to do something more than trying and failing.

The one thing that "worries" me is taking three exams within a week. I usually follow the courses well, but i am not very proficient at studying for exams.

The alternative is to choose the modern physics course later, thus bringing it down to only two math based courses at the same time and this would obviously be very manageable. But it will cause a bit of a problem in my schedule during my last year of undergrad.

Writing all of this i realize i have pretty much decided where i stand in this question, i want to give it a shot. But i still appreciate any advice.
 
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  • #2
I would be conservative here and not overload yourself. One you want to keep your grades up and two sometimes things happen where you can't keep up the pace (catch the flu, family issue, friend needs help...) and three you're a student go do some friendly socializing but not too much. Take a walk and skip the alcohol, drugs and games that others often do.

At my school, I found that taking even one course would overwhelm me as I was also working 20+ hours per week, it was a trimester of normally 3 courses over 10 weeks. I found it best to take one math course and one physics course at a time.
 
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  • #3
jedishrfu said:
I would be conservative here and not overload your self. One you want to keep your grades up and two sometimes things happen where you can't keep up the pace (catch the flu, family issue, friend needs help...) and three you're a student go do some friendly socializing but not too much. Take a walk and skip the alcohol, drugs and games that others often do.

At my school, I found that taking even one course would overwhelm me as I was also working 20+ hours per week, it was a trimester of normally 3 courses over 10 weeks. I found it best to take one math course and one physics course at a time.
One thing i didn't add, is that during november-january i will only have one math based course, "Continuous time signals and systems" along with two "easy" non-math based courses. This will hopefully give me time to prepare for this more "strenuous" semester.

I don't have to worry about work, i exercise a lot, i don't drink or do drugs and i do socialize a little occasionally :)
 
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Related to Multiple physics and maths courses at the same time?

1. What are the benefits of taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time?

Taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time can help students to develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills. It also allows students to see the connections between different topics and apply their knowledge to real-world situations. Additionally, it can save time and money by completing courses simultaneously.

2. Is it challenging to manage multiple physics and maths courses at the same time?

Managing multiple physics and maths courses can be challenging, but it is not impossible. Students should prioritize their time, create a study schedule, and seek help from professors or tutors if needed. It is also important to stay organized and stay on top of assignments and deadlines.

3. Will taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time affect my grades?

It is possible that taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time may affect grades, especially if the workload becomes overwhelming. However, if a student effectively manages their time and seeks help when needed, it is possible to maintain good grades in all courses.

4. Can taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time help with future career opportunities?

Yes, taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time can be beneficial for future career opportunities. Many careers, such as engineering, finance, and data analysis, require a strong foundation in both physics and maths. Having knowledge in both subjects can make a candidate more competitive and open up more job opportunities.

5. Are there any tips for success when taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time?

Some tips for success when taking multiple physics and maths courses at the same time include staying organized, seeking help when needed, actively participating in class, and practicing regularly. It is also important to take breaks and maintain a healthy balance between studying and other activities. Additionally, setting realistic goals and staying motivated can help students to succeed in their courses.

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