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Mutual Inductance and wire coils

  1. Nov 3, 2006 #1
    Hi..I am new here and I am really thankful for any help that I may get :blushing:

    I am stuck in a problem of mutual inductance. It seems fairly simple, yet I cannot get the correct answer.

    Two coils are close to each other. The first coil carries a time-varying current given by I(t) = (4.60 A) e-0.0250tsin(377 t). At t = 0.800 s, the voltage measured across the second coil is -3.60 V. What is the mutual inductance of the coils?


    So, the equation I have used is: emf2 = -M dI1/dt ...which is the voltage of the second coil equals the mutual inductance times the current with respect to time. I solved for M, but the answer is not right.

    My answer was: 80 V*s/A and I got various other answers but they are incorrect.

    I really, really would appreciate any help! Thankyou so much!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 3, 2006 #2

    OlderDan

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    Is it by any chance more like 472 V*s/A?.
     
  4. Nov 3, 2006 #3
    Well, I actually did get answers in the hundreds, but when I put my answer in, it tells me it has the wrong magnitude. And since they provide me with the units, it says mHz...so the answer is multiplied by 1/10^3.... and I really don't understand why. I get no answer near that.
     
  5. Nov 5, 2006 #4

    OlderDan

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    Are you sure it is mHz and not just mH? The units of inductance are named after Joseph Henry.

    H = V·s/A
     
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