Need help with Charged objects and Electron Force

In summary, the problem asks how many electrons must be transferred from a -3 microC charged plate to a +2 microC charged rod so that both objects have the same charge. The equation N = q/e can be used to find the number of electrons, but before that, the amount of charge that needs to be transferred must be determined. It is not simply 0.5 microC, as initially thought, because the final charges should be equal in magnitude and sign.
  • #1
Haniszmi
13
0

Homework Statement


A plate carries a charge of -3microC, while a rod carries a charge of +2microC. How many electrons must be transferred from the plate to the rod, so that both objects have the same charge?


Homework Equations


N= q/e


The Attempt at a Solution


I tried finding the amount of electrons and I stopped there, I really don't know how to go about with this problem.
 
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  • #2
Before worrying about electrons, how much charge (in microC) must be transferred from the plate?
 
  • #3
Redbelly98 said:
Before worrying about electrons, how much charge (in microC) must be transferred from the plate?

1/2 microC's?
 
  • #4
Haniszmi said:
1/2 microC's?

Let's see what happens in that case.

The -3 μC plate loses 0.5 μC, and so ends up with a charge of -3.5 μC.

The +2 μC rod gains +0.5 μC charge, ending up with 2.5 μC.

The final charges, -3.5 and +2.5 μC, are not equal. So no, it would not be 0.5 μC transferred.

The charges should be equal in magnitude and sign, (either both +, or both -) after the charge transfer.
 
  • #5
wow thx
 

1. What is a charged object?

A charged object is an object that has an excess or deficiency of electrons, resulting in the object having a positive or negative charge. This charge is caused by the transfer of electrons between objects through a process called electrostatic induction.

2. How does the electron force work?

The electron force, also known as the electrostatic force, is a fundamental force of nature that acts between charged particles, such as electrons and protons. It is an attractive force between opposite charges and a repulsive force between like charges. The strength of this force depends on the distance between the charged particles and the amount of charge they possess.

3. What is the difference between static and dynamic charges?

Static charges are charges that are stationary and do not move, while dynamic charges are charges that are in motion. Static charges are typically observed in objects that are not conductive, such as plastic or rubber, while dynamic charges can be observed in conductive materials, such as metals.

4. How can I calculate the force between two charged objects?

The force between two charged objects can be calculated using Coulomb's Law, which states that the force is directly proportional to the product of the two charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. The formula for this is F = k(q1q2)/d^2, where F is the force, k is a constant, q1 and q2 are the charges, and d is the distance between the two objects.

5. Can the electron force be shielded or cancelled out?

Yes, the electron force can be shielded or cancelled out by using a conductor. Conductors, such as metals, have free electrons that can move around and neutralize the electric field created by the charged objects. This can effectively shield the objects from each other and reduce or cancel out the electron force between them.

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