A plate carries a charge of -5.2 μC

In summary: This problem asks for the number of electrons that must be transferred to a rod in order to make it have the same charge as a plate that is already charged with -5.2 μC.
  • #1
isukatphysics69
453
8

Homework Statement


A plate carries a charge of -5.2 μC, while a rod carries a charge of +1.8 μC. How many electrons must be transferred from the plate to the rod so that both objects have the same charge?

Homework Equations


N/A

The Attempt at a Solution


So I am imagining a plate and a rod touching, net charge at the touching point is 0 because of the transfer of electrons. So after a transfer of 1.8 from the rod to the plate there will be no more positive in the rod.. now there are still negatives in the plate and now the rod is completely negative. Wont the negatives then repel each other to the corner? how does neutralization happen here?
 
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  • #2
You're overthinking it. Don't worry about how the transfer happens. What number is halfway in between -5.2 and +1.8 (just average them)? How much do you have to change each number by to get to that middle value? That number is in ##\mu C##. How many electrons corresponds to that many ##\mu C##?

But in answer to your direct question, after a transfer of ##1.8 \mu C## so that the plate has ##-3.4 \mu C## and the rod has ##0 \mu C##, the charge is still imbalanced, and half of the charge that's on the plate is going to transfer to the rod so that they have the same charge (under the assumptions of this problem that the charges equalize).

If you have a conductor with a net charge touching another one with no net charge, charge will transfer. There will be electric forces pushing the charge onto the neutral object, attempting to equalize the potential.
 
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  • #3
RPinPA said:
You're overthinking it. Don't worry about how the transfer happens. What number is halfway in between -5.2 and +1.8 (just average them)? How much do you have to change each number by to get to that middle value? That number is in ##\mu C##. How many electrons corresponds to that many ##\mu C##?

But in answer to your direct question, after a transfer of ##1.8 \mu C## so that the
hey I was reading your second part and you cut off, can you explain??
 
  • #4
RPinPA said:
You're overthinking it. Don't worry about how the transfer happens. What number is halfway in between -5.2 and +1.8 (just average them)? How much do you have to change each number by to get to that middle value? That number is in ##\mu C##. How many electrons corresponds to that many ##\mu C##?

But in answer to your direct question, after a transfer of ##1.8 \mu C## so that the plate has ##-3.4 \mu C## and the rod has ##0 \mu C##, the charge is still imbalanced, and half of the charge that's on the plate is going to transfer to the rod so that they have the same charge (under the assumptions of this problem that the charges equalize).

If you have a conductor with a net charge touching another one with no net charge, charge will transfer. There will be electric forces pushing the charge onto the neutral object, attempting to equalize the potential.
ok awsome explanation thank you
 
  • #5
im getting -3.5,

(-5.2+1.8)/2 = -1.7

1.8+x = -1.7
x = -3.5
 
  • #6
I don't get this problem
 
  • #7
isukatphysics69 said:
im getting -3.5,

(-5.2+1.8)/2 = -1.7

1.8+x = -1.7
x = -3.5
What are the units for this answer?

What does the the problem ask for?
isukatphysics69 said:

Homework Statement


A plate carries a charge of -5.2 μC, while a rod carries a charge of +1.8 μC. How many electrons must be transferred from the plate to the rod so that both objects have the same charge?
 

Related to A plate carries a charge of -5.2 μC

1. What does the term "charge" mean in this context?

In this context, "charge" refers to the property of an object that causes it to experience and produce electrical and magnetic forces. It is usually measured in units of Coulombs (C).

2. How is the charge of a plate measured?

The charge of a plate is measured using a device called an electrometer, which can detect and measure the amount of electric charge on an object. The unit used to measure charge is the Coulomb (C).

3. What does the negative sign in front of the charge value indicate?

The negative sign indicates that the plate has an excess of electrons, making it negatively charged. This means that the plate has gained electrons from another object, making it more negatively charged than the other object.

4. What does the magnitude of the charge value (-5.2 μC) represent?

The magnitude of the charge value represents the amount of electric charge on the plate. In this case, it is -5.2 microCoulombs (μC), which is a very small amount of charge.

5. How does the charge of a plate affect its behavior?

The charge of a plate can affect its behavior in various ways. For example, two plates with opposite charges will attract each other, while two plates with the same charge will repel each other. The charge can also affect the plate's interaction with other charged objects and its ability to conduct electricity.

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