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Need to ask this question again

  1. Mar 31, 2010 #1
    A few days ago, I asked about the continuity of a function, in regards to a problem on my homework. Something still seems wrong, even though today my professor insisted that the given definitions are correct. Look here: http://www.math.washington.edu/~sullivan/3261_sp10.pdf"

    A function f(x,y) is continuous at a point (x0,y0) if f(x,y) is defined at (x0,y0), ....

    A function f(x,y) is discontinuous at a point (x0,y0) if f(x,y) is defined at (x0,y0), .....


    So if a function isn't defined, then it is neither continuous or discontinuous????????
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 31, 2010 #2

    Dick

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    According to those definitions, I'll agree. Yes, if it's not defined it's neither continuous nor discontinuous.
     
  4. Mar 31, 2010 #3
    Weird
     
  5. Mar 31, 2010 #4

    Dick

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    Well, think about f(x)=sqrt(x). That's only defined for x>=0. You certainly don't want to say it's continuous at x=(-1). And it also sounds a little weird to say it's discontinuous at x=(-1). It's just not defined. Not all that strange.
     
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