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Neutral electron gas in galaxy halo?

  1. Feb 2, 2007 #1

    smm

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    i was thinking this for few days

    suppose glouds of neutral particles ne (m=0,5Mev) exists in galaxys halo. ne would easily decay
    to electron or positron near atoms nucleus or if its disturbed some way. (so it wouldn't be found
    in high energy lab) - ne could be produced only by direct pair prodution .
    if ne can form degenerated matter then there might be also degenerated "ne-stars".

    i am suggesting this ne because heim's mass formula predicts such particle.
    M(ne)=0,5167049Mev

    so therefore:
    -there should be extra absorbtion in gamma rays near 1Mev due to pair production of nelectron
    and antine.
    -there should be (weak?) soft x-ray source between 1-5Kev due to ne-decay (possibly interacting with other matter or with cosmic rays)
    (maximum depends on typical neutrino's energy) in halo
    -if ne's degenerates there should be ne-stars and gamma ray burst source (forming ne-stars) in
    halo
    -there should be some emission from Ne particles colliding with each other or with matter like stars and gas
    - there should be electron impact ionization near halo because ne-decay produces
    electrons
    -in high energy collisions there could be small time when nelectrons exist before they
    decay (near nucleus)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2007 #2

    mathman

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    What are ne???
     
  4. Feb 2, 2007 #3

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    By what theory or model does one assume a neutral electron (ne) of 0,5167049 Mev would decay into a e- or e+ with rest energy of 0.511. That would require a + or - particle and perhaps a third neutral particle. What about lepton conservation?
     
  5. Feb 3, 2007 #4

    smm

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    ne is (theoretical) neutral electron, which is lepton without charge.

    in normal conditions such decay wouldn't happen spontanously, it would need some kind of trigger, like collision with nucleus or gamma ray.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2007 #5

    mathman

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    In the standard model the only neutral leptons are neutrinos, which are much lighter than electrons.
     
  7. Feb 4, 2007 #6

    smm

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    about charge conservation of ne-decay in nucleus, the electron could steal its charge from nucleus

    -
    heim's mass formula predicts elementary particles masses, lifetimes and fine structure
    constant. i can't say exactly how much it has extrapolation since the math
    is quite complicated

    heim's formula predicts such particle, but (i think) it doesn't tell does
    it decay, this is an assumption.

    if the formula has really some deeper meaning to particle physics,
    something must have happened to neutral electron. otherwise it would have
    been seen in lab.
    for example:
    -something may prevent it from forming or it will decay in nucleus somehow before it can escape.

    if later is true, then if there have been still particle formation processes
    which produce ne, there must be some areas in space where these particles
    have been saved.

    as to my knowledge there could be ne- gas in galaxy halo. depending to ne properties, there also must then be some 'traces' it leaves.

    the question could these objects
    exists in galactic halo in basis of observations. does it fit?
    or what kind of objects could fit observations?

    here are found some basics of heim's particle theory
    http://www.heim-theory.com/Contents...s_Mass-Fo/introduction_to_heim_s_mass-fo.html
     
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