Newton's Second Law of Motion acceleration problem

In summary, an object with a mass of 10.0 kg is sliding upward on a slippery vertical wall. A force of 60 N at an angle of 60 degrees is acting on the object, resulting in a normal force of 30 N exerted by the wall. The object's acceleration is determined to be 44.44 m/s^2 using the equations D=1/2(Vo+Vi)T, A=V/T, and Fnet=ma. The magnitude of the net force on a 2000 kg plane accelerated from rest to a launch speed of 320 km/h in 2.0 sec is calculated to be 88,880 N.
  • #1
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An object (mass 10.0 kg) slides upward on a slippery vertical wall. A force F of 60 N acts at an angle of 60 degrees (the force is 60 degrees South of the x+ axis, it's shown in a picture) Determine the normal force exerted on the object by the wall. Next, determine the object's acceleration.


F=m*a
F=m*g*sin(angle)
a=g*sin(angle)


Well I know that the equation for the y-dir would be 60cos60 which gives you 30 N. That is the normal force exerted by the wall. I can't visualize/understand this so if someone could explain this a bit better to me that would be great! I'm not sure of the other equations to use in this one.
 
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  • #2
I think I figured it out...First off...
M=2000 KG
Vi=0
Vo=320 km/hr = 88.88 m/sec
T=2.0 sec

Ok, I then used the equation D=1/2(Vo+Vi)T which turned out to be 88.88 M. So D=88.88 M. Then I used the equation A=V/T. That turned out to be 44.44 m/sec^2. Finally, I used Fnet=ma. This turned out to be 88,880. The answer in the back was 8.9*10^4 which is 89,000. Do I do this problem correct?
 
  • #3
wait...Ah I'm doing another problem...sorry! See I can figure out the problems that don't involve angles...those angles are so complicated! Ah back to trying to solve the first one... the one I solved was..."A jet catapult on an aircraft carrier accelerates a 2000 kg plane uniformly from rest to a launch speed of 320 km/h in 2.0 sec. What is the magnitude of the net force on the plane?
 

Related to Newton's Second Law of Motion acceleration problem

1. What is Newton's Second Law of Motion?

Newton's Second Law of Motion states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on the object and inversely proportional to its mass. In simpler terms, the more force applied to an object, the greater its acceleration will be, and the more mass an object has, the less it will accelerate.

2. How do you calculate acceleration using Newton's Second Law of Motion?

The formula for calculating acceleration using Newton's Second Law of Motion is: a = F/m, where 'a' is the acceleration, 'F' is the net force acting on the object, and 'm' is the mass of the object.

3. Can Newton's Second Law of Motion be applied to objects with varying mass?

Yes, Newton's Second Law of Motion can be applied to objects with varying mass. This is because the formula for acceleration takes into account the mass of the object, meaning that the acceleration will be affected by changes in mass.

4. How does Newton's Second Law of Motion relate to everyday situations?

Newton's Second Law of Motion can be seen in everyday situations, such as pushing a shopping cart, riding a bike, or throwing a ball. In each of these scenarios, the acceleration of the object is affected by the amount of force applied and the mass of the object.

5. Can Newton's Second Law of Motion be used to calculate the acceleration of an object in a vacuum?

Yes, Newton's Second Law of Motion can be used to calculate the acceleration of an object in a vacuum. In a vacuum, there is no air resistance or other external forces acting on the object, so the net force will be equal to the force applied and the acceleration can be calculated using the formula a = F/m.

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