No covalent bond formation due to repulsion

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential for repulsive forces to dominate during covalent bond formation in chemistry, leading to the formation of no bond. Examples such as the diatomic molecule He2 and the unstable diatomic ion He22+ are mentioned as possible cases.
  • #1
Maria Malik
1
0
Hi,
I want to ask , is there any example in chemistry when during covalent bond formation the repulsive forces dominate and no bond is formed.
Thanks
 
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  • #2
It's tough to know exactly what you mean. Plenty of diatomics have zero bond order (He2, for example), but I'm not sure I'd call the cause of that a "repulsive force." In fact, the helium dimer is weakly bound by dispersion forces. The closest thing I can think to what you're asking is a case like He22+, which is isoelectronic with H2, so it has a bond order of 1, but it is unstable because the two nuclei repel each other electrostatically.
 

What is a covalent bond?

A covalent bond is a type of chemical bond where two atoms share electrons in order to achieve a stable electron configuration.

How does repulsion affect covalent bond formation?

Repulsion is a force that acts between charged particles, such as electrons. In covalent bond formation, repulsion between the electrons of two atoms can prevent the formation of a bond.

Why does repulsion occur in covalent bonds?

Repulsion occurs in covalent bonds because electrons have a negative charge and like charges repel each other. If the repulsive force is stronger than the attractive force between the two atoms, a covalent bond cannot form.

Can repulsion be overcome in covalent bond formation?

Yes, repulsion can be overcome in covalent bond formation if the attractive force between the two atoms is stronger than the repulsive force. This can happen when the two atoms have different electronegativities, meaning one atom has a stronger pull on the shared electrons.

What are some factors that can increase repulsion in covalent bonds?

Factors that can increase repulsion in covalent bonds include the size of the atoms involved, the number of shared electrons, and the distance between the two atoms. These factors can affect the strength of the repulsive force and make it more difficult for a covalent bond to form.

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