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Novels for an electrical engineer?

  1. Jun 22, 2009 #1
    I have been looking for a good book to read for a very long time. I am interested in something that would appeal to an electrical engineering student. Preferably a fiction of some sort with a sense of technology and adventure or action. I guess maybe a sci-fi of some sort.. Any recommendations? I have some downtime now as my summer classes are coming to a close. Thanks all.
     
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  3. Jun 22, 2009 #2

    chroot

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    Seems like almost anything by Neal Stephenson would apply. Snow Crash is my favorite, but Cryptonomicon is quite good, too.

    - Warren
     
  4. Jun 22, 2009 #3

    russ_watters

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    The Sum of All Fears
     
  5. Jun 22, 2009 #4
    Thanks. Any others?
     
  6. Jun 22, 2009 #5
    The Subtraction of All Fears.
     
  7. Jun 22, 2009 #6

    Hepth

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    I agree with this. Read his books.


    The Mars Trilogy was good too (by Kim Stanley Robinson)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_trilogy
     
  8. Jun 23, 2009 #7
    A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr.
     
  9. Jun 24, 2009 #8

    EnumaElish

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  10. Jun 24, 2009 #9
    John D. Anderson's "Computational Fluid Dynamics: The Basics with Applications" is a fun read
     
  11. Jun 24, 2009 #10
    I thought that the story line of this book was kind of predicable and it lacked character development.
     
  12. Jun 24, 2009 #11

    russ_watters

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    Formulaic?
     
  13. Jun 24, 2009 #12

    Danger

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    As Enuma posted, William Gibson writes some great stuff. Mona Lisa Overdrive and Burning Chrome are a couple of my favourite books. If you want your science a bit harder, you can't beat James P. Hogan and Larry Niven. Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, etc. were all university science graduates as well, and tried to remain faithful to reality in their writings. (Heinlein was a right-wing racist sexist pig, though, so you might not like his stuff.)


    I have that same problem with the dictionary.
     
  14. Jun 24, 2009 #13
    Incidentally, "Mona Lisa Overdrive" is also a pretty cool Juno Reactor song:


    Last time I was looking for some interesting sci fi book to read, I picked up Heinlein's "Stranger in a Strange Land." I couldn't get past the first 30 pages...I just felt it was a terribly unrealistic and unscientific view of the future :/
     
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  15. Jun 24, 2009 #14

    Danger

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    While it's probably his best-known novel, it's also one of his worst. It took me a couple of weeks to read it, at a time when I normally read 2 books per day. Farnham's Freehold was pretty unpleasant as well, and seriously demonstrated his racism. Allowing for the pedophilic sexism, though, I rather liked 'Podkayne of Mars'.
     
  16. Jun 25, 2009 #15

    turbo

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    One of the worst examples (in this regard) of his work, and one of the best examples of his work in regard to crafstmanship (IMO) is "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress". I sure wouldn't want him dictating propriety in my society, but then again, I wouldn't want Theodore Sturgeon calling the shots, either.
     
  17. Jun 25, 2009 #16
    If you are just looking for hard[er] science fiction I would suggest Greg Bear.
    If you like books like what Clancy writes Bear's Quantico might be a good start.
    Blood Music is one of his most famous novels though apparently being where the 'Grey Goo' scenario comes from.

    As for things that deal with electrical engineering... I have no clue. I've been trying to think of books with more of an engineers touch but haven't thought of any. Maybe Airframe by Crichton. Its highly thrillerized which makes it a bit cheesy but its not bad in my non-engineer's opinion.
     
  18. Jun 25, 2009 #17

    Danger

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    It's about 40 years since I read that book, but I still have it. Maybe I should read it again just to remind me how much it pissed me off.
    To be more specific about authors that I already mentioned, I seriously recommend the 'Ringworld' series by Niven (which is part of his 'Known Space' superseries) and Hogan's 'The Proteus Operation'. The latter is just about the best ever examination of what would happen if something was changed in the past. Two of the major characters are Einstein and Churchill. My favourite of his, though, is called 'The Genesis Machine'. Heavy physics, from the standpoint of a non-physicist.
    Another great one, if you have an interest in NTSB-type forensics, is 'Flameout'. I can't remember the author's name right now, and I'm at W's place because she still has my internet connection, but I'll post it tomorrow.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2009
  19. Jun 25, 2009 #18

    MATLABdude

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    Old Man's War by John Scalzi was great, as were the follow-ups (I thought The Last Colony was a little weak, compared to the rest, though).

    Additionally, many good works are available at the Baen Free Library (along with new, for pay releases); great way to kill a (non-driving) commute, especially if you have a PDA or iPod or some such:
    http://www.baen.com/
     
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