Nuclear Equation, not sure it its right

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So a neutron is (1,0)n.In summary, the correct balanced nuclear equation for the bombardment of curium-246 with carbon-12 to produce four neutrons and another nucleus is (246 96)Cm + (12 6)C => (254 98)No + 4(1 0)n. This equation conserves both the mass number and atomic number on both sides and takes into account the mass defect, which is converted into energy according to Einstein's famous equation.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



Write a balanced nuclear equation for the bombardment of curium-246, (246 96)Cm, with carbon-12 to produce four neutrons and another nucleus.

Homework Equations



conservation

The Attempt at a Solution



So this is what i got,
(246 96)Cm + (12 6)C => (246 102)No + 4(1 0)n
is this right?
 
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  • #2
No. Thats not it. You have to conserve the mass number and the atomic number on both sides. For a neutron, its (1,1)n. So, sum up the mass numbers on the left side of the equation and the total mass of the know quantities on the right, and subtract them to get the mass of the atom produced.

Similarly, conserve the atomic number on both sides to get the atomic number of the nucleus produced to get your equation.
 
  • #3
is it this? 1) (246 96)Cm + (12 6)C => (254 102)No + 4(1 0)n

or this?,

2) (246 96)Cm + (12 6)C => (254 98)No + 4(1 1)n

i don't have an example where the neutron is (1 1)n either, is it possible to have both a (1 0)n and (1 1)n neutron?

id think the first one, 1), looks like the right solution, but the textbook I am using has no solutions in it, so i have no idea if I am right or not.
 
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  • #4
The second one is the right solution. Think about it. How can mass suddenly appear on the right side as it did in the first equation?

In fact, if you take actual masses (not just the whole numbers, but the decimals as well), you'll see that there is a mass defect, or mass difference between the two sides of the equation. This is converted into energy given quantitatively by Einstiens equation E=mc^2.

And youre right about the (1,0)n. I made a mistake. Sorry. A proton is (1,1)p.
 

1. What is a nuclear equation?

A nuclear equation is a type of chemical equation that represents the process of radioactive decay. It shows the breakdown of unstable atoms into more stable atoms by releasing energy in the form of radiation.

2. How is a nuclear equation written?

A nuclear equation is written in the form of reactant => product + radiation. The reactant is the unstable atom that undergoes decay, the product is the stable atom formed after decay, and the radiation is the energy released during the process.

3. What is the purpose of a nuclear equation?

The purpose of a nuclear equation is to show the type of radioactive decay that a particular atom undergoes and the resulting stable atom formed. It also helps in predicting the amount of radiation released during the process.

4. Can nuclear equations be balanced?

Yes, nuclear equations can be balanced just like regular chemical equations. The number of protons, neutrons, and electrons must be the same on both sides of the equation to follow the law of conservation of mass and charge.

5. How are nuclear equations used in real life?

Nuclear equations have many practical applications, such as in nuclear power plants where they are used to generate electricity. They are also used in medical procedures like PET scans and cancer treatments. Additionally, nuclear equations are used in research to study the properties of different elements and their isotopes.

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