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Homework Help: Numerical Sedov-Taylor (blast-wave) solution

  1. Dec 21, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I was asked to model the blast-wave of an explosion using Sedov's solution in MATLAB, but I'm not really sure where to begin. Most of the programming I have done has been

    Code (Text):

    x=linspace(1,1000,1000);
    for i=1:1000
         y(i)=x(i)^2;
    end
     
    type of code, and this one seems a lot more complex (I found a version of this code in C [sorta familiar with C, to some extent all object oriented languages are the same] which is long and has many functions in it which leads me to the 'complex' conclusion here).

    Any suggestions on where to begin? If not, any suggestions on a better book than Sedov's Similarity and Dimensional Methods in Mechanics to get me started? Or maybe both?


    2. Relevant equations

    [tex]
    \frac{r}{r_2}=\left[\frac{(\nu+2)(\gamma+1)}{4}V\right]^{-2/(2+\nu)}\left[\frac{\gamma+1}{\gamma-1}\left(\frac{(\nu+2)\gamma}{2}V-1\right)\right]^{-\alpha_2}\left[\frac{(\nu+2)(\gamma+1)}{(\nu+2)(\gamma+1)-2[2+\nu(\gamma-1)]}\left(1-\frac{2+\nu(\gamma-1)}{2}V\right)\right]^{-\alpha_1}
    [/tex]
    and a couple others

    3. The attempt at a solution

    Not sure where to begin, so not much of a solution attempt can exist. I did try using the equation above and changing V from its lower bound of [itex]2/([\nu+2]\gamma)[/itex] to its upper bound of [itex]4/((\nu+2)(\gamma+1))[/itex] but that gave me bad data.

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2010 #2
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