Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4th Edition) by Robert Lafore

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  • Thread starter PainterGuy
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hello every1,

i was able to find this book "Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4th Edition) by Robert Lafore" in a local library. im thinking of self-learning c++.. do u have any information on this text...is it easy...im totally blank in this area of programming and computers in general... any information is welcome. thanx
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
jtbell
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Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3
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a bundle of thanx, jtbell.
 
  • #4
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Geez this makes me sad. This book is 1040 pages of introductory C++ for about $43 CAD, where as my first semester C++ textbook is 928 pages, of introductory and intermediate C++ for about $145 CAD.
 
  • #5
It a really great book! hf :P
 
  • #6
Hello ever 1
I have the same book .. and is quit intresting . I personally have learned c and have so basic knowledge about programming with C. But I have this constant fare of don't being able to do it.. can plz come 1 guide me how can i get this fare out of my mind??/
thank you in advance
 
  • #7
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The way to get over your fear of not being able to do something is to practice doing what you are afraid of. Do you have any questions about the examples or problems that are given in this book?
 
  • #8
You need to practice more to overcome that fear. Try to assign a task for yourself or take up exercise questions from other C++ programming books and try to solve them.
 
  • #9
I have referred to many books eg: detel detel, pohl etc. but I find Lafore the best. The best topic was the example of how a programmer and customer interact and develop software. T
 
  • #10
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Hi everyone,:smile:

I also have the same book. Sorry this is not the best. In every section the author assumes the reader knows about C programing and programming in general. May be it is good book for a programmer who wants to review the material but not for the newbie like me.

Cheers
 
  • #11
hello every1,

i was able to find this book "Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4th Edition) by Robert Lafore" in a local library. im thinking of self-learning c++.. do u have any information on this text...is it easy...im totally blank in this area of programming and computers in general... any information is welcome. thanx
oh this book is used as a course book for mechanical engineering department in ciit,sahiwal,pakistan. i am a student of mecahnical engineering so i recommend you to read this book happily and enjoy the world of c++.
 
  • #12
Geez this makes me sad. This book is 1040 pages of introductory C++ for about $43 CAD, where as my first semester C++ textbook is 928 pages, of introductory and intermediate C++ for about $145 CAD.
don,t worry all the pages are only interpretations but if you are able to learn the fundamentals than pages are no problem
 
  • #13
chiro
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Hi everyone,:smile:

I also have the same book. Sorry this is not the best. In every section the author assumes the reader knows about C programing and programming in general. May be it is good book for a programmer who wants to review the material but not for the newbie like me.

Cheers
Hey PainterGuy.

It's actually probably a good idea that you learn the ideas of C before you learn the C++ specific concepts.

I'll give you some reasons why.

The first thing you have to understand is that the basic computing architecture is a procedural one. You put commands in memory (and data but lets not focus on that just yet) and you start somewhere and execute your code from the top down.

Now of course when you're doing this your pointer to the instruction can go back when you have things like loops or can jump when you call a function or maybe if you're using threads of writing interrupt code your code will just jump to another place and then return back where it was later on.

So when you're learning to code you need to get skills in two areas: state and flow-control. These are the two most important things. You will write code and it will go wrong. In order to understand where it wrong and to not create those kind of problems again, you will need to debug your code and that means stepping through the code, and looking at the state of your data in memory.

Once you have learned the state and flow-control in C, you then see whats changed when you move to C++ with things like classes and constructors and destructors and so on. Then if you haven't used threads in C, you will focus again on what happens with state and flow-control when you introduce threads.

I will tell you know that if you can not get the flow control right in something like C, you won't get it right in C++.
 
  • #14
603
24
Hey PainterGuy.

It's actually probably a good idea that you learn the ideas of C before you learn the C++ specific concepts.

I'll give you some reasons why.

The first thing you have to understand is that the basic computing architecture is a procedural one. You put commands in memory (and data but lets not focus on that just yet) and you start somewhere and execute your code from the top down.

Now of course when you're doing this your pointer to the instruction can go back when you have things like loops or can jump when you call a function or maybe if you're using threads of writing interrupt code your code will just jump to another place and then return back where it was later on.

So when you're learning to code you need to get skills in two areas: state and flow-control. These are the two most important things. You will write code and it will go wrong. In order to understand where it wrong and to not create those kind of problems again, you will need to debug your code and that means stepping through the code, and looking at the state of your data in memory.

Once you have learned the state and flow-control in C, you then see whats changed when you move to C++ with things like classes and constructors and destructors and so on. Then if you haven't used threads in C, you will focus again on what happens with state and flow-control when you introduce threads.

I will tell you know that if you can not get the flow control right in something like C, you won't get it right in C++.
Hi chiro,

Many thanks for your advice. Now I will stick to this book by Lafore because it also introduces some C concepts. You have always been helpful to me. Thanks for this.

Cheers
 

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