On black holes and relativity.

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of relativistic mass and its effects on a neutron star when a particle is set in motion near the speed of light. It also addresses the question of whether or not an object can become a black hole by moving too fast. The conclusion is that in the particle's reference frame, the neutron star could potentially collapse into a black hole, but in the star's reference frame it would still not have enough mass.
  • #1
James Leighe
230
0
Ok, starting with a 'test' universe with only two objects, a single particle and a neutron star just under the mass required to collapse further into a black hole.

If the particle was set in motion near the speed of light, in it's reference frame the neutron star would gain (significant) relativistic mass correct?

So, in the particles reference frame, the star would collapse into a black hole... But in the stars reference frame it would still not be massive enough to collapse right?

I obviously missed something important here, if someone can just correct me that would be nice.
 
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  • #3

Related to On black holes and relativity.

1. What is a black hole?

A black hole is an incredibly dense and compact object in space, formed from a massive star that has collapsed in on itself. Its gravitational pull is so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape from it.

2. How are black holes formed?

Black holes are formed when a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel and can no longer support its own weight. The star then collapses in on itself, creating a black hole.

3. How do black holes affect time and space?

Black holes have a strong gravitational pull that can warp space and time around them. This can cause time to slow down or even stop completely, and can also affect the paths of objects and light passing near the black hole.

4. Can anything escape from a black hole?

According to our current understanding of physics, nothing can escape from a black hole once it has passed the event horizon, which is the point of no return. However, some theories suggest that information may be able to escape from a black hole.

5. How do scientists study black holes?

Scientists use a variety of tools and techniques to study black holes, including telescopes that can detect X-rays and other forms of electromagnetic radiation emitted by matter falling into a black hole. They also use computer simulations and mathematical models to understand the behavior of black holes.

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