One more impulse problem Hopefully

  • Thread starter TheHamburgler1
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In summary, when a good bunter pulls the bat back right as contact is made with the ball, it decreases the impulse of the bat on the ball, and this action increases the average force of the bat on the ball.
  • #1
TheHamburgler1
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a good bunter pulls the bat back right as contact is made with the ball. Why is this so?

1 This action decreases the impulse of the bat on the ball
2 This action increases the impulse of the bat on the ball
3 This action increases the average force of the bat on the ball
4 This action decreases the average force of the bat on the ball

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) 1 and 3
d) 2 and 4
e) 1 and 4

What I know so far is that because he pulls the bat back it makes the Time larger therefore the force is smaller meaning that 4 is correct but I don't think the impulse decreases or increases. What do I do next?
 
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  • #2
TheHamburgler1 said:
a good bunter pulls the bat back right as contact is made with the ball. Why is this so?

1 This action decreases the impulse of the bat on the ball
2 This action increases the impulse of the bat on the ball
3 This action increases the average force of the bat on the ball
4 This action decreases the average force of the bat on the ball

a) 1 only
b) 2 only
c) 1 and 3
d) 2 and 4
e) 1 and 4

What I know so far is that because he pulls the bat back it makes the Time larger therefore the force is smaller meaning that 4 is correct but I don't think the impulse decreases or increases. What do I do next?
Do you know the meanings of impulse and force? Not the formulae, but an actual understanding of each? If you can comprehend what an impulse and a force are each actually measuring, you can understand this question in no time.

I'd suggest going over the chapters in your text related to each. Once you understand them, this will be no sweat. :)
 
  • #3
Pulling back on the bat during a bunt helps to keep the ball from bouncing hard back out into the field. You want to have the ball slowly roll out after a bunt. So what can you say about the change in momentum for a hard bunt versus the soft bunt?
 

Related to One more impulse problem Hopefully

1. What is the "One more impulse problem"?

The "One more impulse problem" is a concept in physics that refers to the additional force or impulse required to change the motion of an object. It is often encountered in scenarios where an object is already in motion and an additional force is needed to alter its trajectory or velocity.

2. How is the "One more impulse problem" calculated?

The "One more impulse problem" can be calculated using the equation: J = mvf - mvi, where J is the impulse, m is the mass of the object, and vf and vi are the final and initial velocities, respectively. This equation is based on the principle of conservation of momentum.

3. What are some real-life examples of the "One more impulse problem"?

Some real-life examples of the "One more impulse problem" include hitting a baseball with a bat, throwing a ball, or kicking a soccer ball. In each of these scenarios, an additional impulse is needed to change the trajectory or speed of the object.

4. How does the "One more impulse problem" relate to Newton's laws of motion?

The "One more impulse problem" is closely related to Newton's laws of motion, specifically the second law which states that the net force acting on an object is equal to its mass multiplied by its acceleration. In the case of the "One more impulse problem", the additional impulse is the net force that causes a change in the object's motion.

5. Why is understanding the "One more impulse problem" important?

Understanding the "One more impulse problem" is important in many fields of science and engineering, such as mechanics, physics, and aerospace engineering. It allows us to predict and control the motion of objects, which has practical applications in fields such as sports, transportation, and space exploration.

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