Optimizing Material Strength: Fact or Fiction?

In summary: This is true, but they have not yet been created in a way that allows for the creation of solid objects. diamond would be a better comparison, because it is a solid material with a perfect lattice structure. However, diamond is incredibly rare and expensive to obtain.
  • #1
kuub
4
0
Dear experts - I'm writing a novel in my spare time, and would appreciate some help with a little bit of research. Some of the story is set in the distant future, where super strong materials are available. My problem is that I don’t know how to describe these super materials. I want to describe the strongest possible atomic configuration of carbon, in a solid three-dimensional structure. Like diamond, but if possible stronger. Does this material already exist in theory? What colour and transparency is this material likely to have? Would it resemble metal? What would this material logically be called?

If you can answer any of these queries, or even make a semi-educated guess, I'd be very grateful indeed.

Thanks for your time.
 
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  • #2
Transparent aluminium? :smile:

Just kidding, it had to make me think of this :biggrin:

Edit: However, you may want to consider this article. Making your path through wikipedia, you may come across something useful. T.A.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
kuub said:
I want to describe the strongest possible atomic configuration of carbon, in a solid three-dimensional structure.

i guess it depends on what you mean by strong.
 
  • #4
ManDay said:
Transparent aluminium? :smile:

Just kidding, it had to make me think of this :biggrin:

Edit: However, you may want to consider this article. Making your path through wikipedai you may come across something useful. T.A.

Well, I did finally find out the plot of Minority Report, from that link :smile:
 
  • #5
Very funny. Transparent aluminium indeed. I mean strong as in tough, resistant to breaking, stuff you'd want to make a crash helmet out of. Like diamond but less brittle. I'm guessing there is a perfect configuration of carbon atoms that would give the stongest bond possible. Like the carbon nanotubes that scientists are theorising about making the space elevator from. But in this case configured to form a matrix or mesh that's suitable for constructing solid objects.
 
  • #6
carbon nanotubes are not just theoretical. they have been created in labs. there is no "perfect configuration".
 
  • #7
Yes there is, you just don't know what it is.
 
  • #8
There must be an optimum atomic structure for strength.
 
  • #9
good luck with that
 
  • #10
Super-strong materials in the future are likely to come from engineered meta-materials (like carbon fibre) rather than some exotic, undiscovered atomic or molecular arrangement.

The reason why there is no optimum structure for "strength" is because it is not a one-dimensional metric. Materials can be resistant to cracking, deforming, twisting, tearing, dissolving, corroding, shearing (cutting) and so on...each of these could be construed as a form of material "strength".

There is no evidence to suggest there is a "holy grail" of atomic configuration that is the "best" in terms of material strength.

Claude.
 

Related to Optimizing Material Strength: Fact or Fiction?

What is "Perfect Atomic Structure"?

"Perfect Atomic Structure" refers to the arrangement of atoms in a substance that is considered to be ideal or optimal. This refers to the positions of the atoms in relation to each other, as well as the types and numbers of atoms present.

How is "Perfect Atomic Structure" determined?

The concept of "Perfect Atomic Structure" is based on theoretical models and calculations, as well as experimental observations. Scientists use various techniques, such as X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to determine the arrangement of atoms in a substance.

Why is "Perfect Atomic Structure" important?

The arrangement of atoms in a substance affects its physical and chemical properties, such as its strength, reactivity, and conductivity. Understanding and controlling the perfect atomic structure can lead to the development of new materials with desired properties.

Is there such a thing as a "Perfect Atomic Structure" for all substances?

No, the perfect atomic structure can vary depending on the type of substance and its conditions. For example, the perfect atomic structure for a solid may differ from that of a liquid or gas, and can also be affected by temperature, pressure, and other factors.

Can "Perfect Atomic Structure" be altered or manipulated?

Yes, scientists can manipulate the atomic structure of a substance through various methods such as chemical reactions, heating, and cooling. This can result in changes in the substance's physical and chemical properties, making it useful for different applications.

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