OT: Looking for good book on performance engines (ICE), trying to learn

In summary, the speakers discuss their interest in engines and their search for a book that can provide information on engine modifications and performance. They mention "Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals" by John Haywood as a highly recommended resource for understanding the principles behind engine operation. They also suggest Peterson Publishing books and seminars from MIT and the University of Wisconsin as additional sources of information.
  • #1
5.0stang
63
0
Well I have always been interested in engines and how to make them more efficient and make more power. Particularly the popular modifying of Ford and GM engines (302ci, 351ci, 350ci, etc.). I am looking for a book that could help me understand how a cam actually works, and what to tweak. Also, some info on strokes, when it becomes not as efficient (steeper rod ratio), etc...

I know this is pretty far "out there"...but I was curious if anyone knew a good book to buy to get me on my way:smile:

Just basic info on how a head's design, stroke of an engine, compression, bore, cam specs, etc...all effect an engine.

Any help or suggestions would be great!
 
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  • #2
For fundamental engine operating parameters (cams, strokes, breathing, combustion, fuels, compression ratios, supercharging) then John Haywood's "Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals" (Mc Graw Hill Press) is the absolute, undisputed bible.

It won't tell you how to tune a specific engine, but it will give you the fundamental knowledge you're after. Getting a few extra BHP out of an engine and understanding how the thing actually works are two completely separate things, and the knowledge behind all this is very involved (and interesting!). This book won't tell you how to design an engine, but it will arm you with a detailed understanding of every single principle involved in the operation of an engine.

It's by far the best engine-related book I've ever read, and it's the one which industry professionals ALWAYS recommend first and foremost.

Having said that, if you don't have a basic understanding of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, or solid mechanics, you might struggle a bit, but the first few chapters are excellent introductions.

It's the best £40 I've ever spent, and in the past year of having owned it I've probably referred to it more frequently than all my other books put together.

ISBN 0-07-100499-8, get on Amazon and order it now.
 
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  • #3
Thanks for that tip, Brewski. Might just have to get one of those for my own self.
5.0Stang, to supplement that, look into various Peterson Publishing books about the subject. Those are the folks that publish Hot Rod and Car Craft magazines, and their stuff is very good. It's aimed at the backyard mechanic who probably doesn't have too much of a formal engineering or physics background, but knows how to twist a wrench. It does get into theory, but is very light on formulae. If the volume that Brewnog suggested is too heavy, or doesn't cover the sort of modifications that you're interested in, the Peterson books will make good companions for it.
 
  • #4
IMO, there are no 'good' books that combine a summary/medium level of the physics and engineering and the performance aspects. Heywood's book is all about the fundamentals which are important. I am not a ME, but I would like to be. I went to a week long class this summer at MIT taught by Heywood and Cheng. It was good. There is simply too much information in one week particularly for a non-engineer. Also, it focuses primarily on the basics which I needed, but would have like some more performance discussion. Unfortunately, all the grant/research money is primarily in emissions management.

You can find info on the MIT class http://web.mit.edu/mitpep/pi/courses/internal_combustion_engines.html".

You also might want to check out these links from the University of Wisconsin. They offer several seminars/classes that last just a few days. One of them is focused on performance. I have not attended it.
http://epdwww.engr.wisc.edu/courses...Internal Combustion Engines&myRegionHead=R-12
http://www.erc.wisc.edu/news/seminar.html
 
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  • #5
I'm very much interested in this topic well. Thanks for the titles and links.
 

Related to OT: Looking for good book on performance engines (ICE), trying to learn

What is a performance engine?

A performance engine is an internal combustion engine (ICE) that has been modified to increase its power output and overall performance. This can include changes to the engine's design, materials, and components, as well as tuning and adjustments to optimize its performance.

What are the benefits of a performance engine?

A performance engine can provide increased horsepower and torque, improved acceleration and top speed, and better overall driving experience. It can also be more reliable and efficient than a stock engine when properly maintained and tuned.

What factors should I consider when choosing a book on performance engines?

When looking for a book on performance engines, consider the author's credentials and experience, the level of detail and technical information provided, and whether it covers the specific type of engine you are interested in. You may also want to read reviews and ask for recommendations from other enthusiasts.

Are there any recommended books for beginners learning about performance engines?

Some popular books for beginners learning about performance engines include "How to Build Performance Nissan Sport Compacts" by Sarah Forst, "Engine Management: Advanced Tuning" by Greg Banish, and "Maximum Boost: Designing, Testing, and Installing Turbocharger Systems" by Corky Bell. It is also helpful to read online forums and articles to supplement your learning.

What are some common modifications for performance engines?

Some common modifications for performance engines include upgrading the intake and exhaust systems, adding forced induction (such as turbochargers or superchargers), and tuning the engine's fuel and ignition systems. Other modifications may include upgrading the engine's internal components, such as the camshaft, pistons, and valves, to increase its power and reliability.

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