Oxford Languages Gets It Wrong Again

  • #1
Hornbein
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half-arse
INFORMAL
verb
past tense: half-assed; past participle: half-assed
  1. do (something) with little effort or care.
    "developers should stop half-arsing things and make good games!"
Ha. Half-assed is usually an adjective or adverb. From now on I'm skipping past the half-assed efforts of Oxford Languages. They must be paying someone to uprate their stuff.
 
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  • #2
Hornbein said:
Ha. Half-assed is usually an adjective or adverb. From now on I'm skipping past the half-assed efforts of Oxford Languages. They must be paying someone to uprate their stuff.
Agree, adjective.
 
  • #3
Hornbein said:
Ha. Half-assed is usually an adjective or adverb. From now on I'm skipping past the half-assed efforts of Oxford Languages. They must be paying someone to uprate their stuff.
I don't understand! If "half-ass" (or is it "half-arse"?) is a verb, then when you say that you half-assed something yesterday, it is the past tense of the verb, isn't it?
 
  • #4
martinbn said:
I don't understand! If "half-ass" (or is it "half-arse"?) is a verb, then when you say that you half-assed something yesterday, it is the past tense of the verb, isn't it?
Right. But I've never heard it used as a verb.
 
  • #5
Hornbein said:
Right. But I've never heard it used as a verb.
Never heard it in present tense if it used that way. How would you conjugate the verb to "half arse?"
 
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  • #6
pinball1970 said:
Never heard it in present tense if it used that way. How would you conjugate the verb to "half arse?"
I guess it is

I half arse
You half arse
He/She/It half arses
...
 
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  • #7
Curiously Oxford Languages does define "half-hearted" as an adjective, not the past participle of a verb.

"Half-hearted" has a similar meaning, but more like "without enthusiasm" whereas "half-arsed" is more like "without competence".
 
  • #8
Hornbein said:
Ha. Half-assed is usually an adjective or adverb. From now on I'm skipping past the half-assed efforts of Oxford Languages. They must be paying someone to uprate their stuff.
Do you have a link? Because the OED only has it as an adjective and adverb.
 
  • #9
DrClaude said:
Do you have a link? Because the OED only has it as an adjective and adverb.
No web site, but it comes up first in my Google search. I suspect they paid for this advantage. Here's a screen shot.

half-arse.jpg


I'm pretty sure they have nothing to do with the OED.
 
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  • #10
That dictionary is half-arsed. Assuming the verb to exist (and I've never come across it), if it was "half-arse" the past tense would be "half-arsed", and if it was "half-ass" the past tense would be "half-assed" (presumably British and American respectively).
 
  • #11
DrGreg said:
Curiously Oxford Languages does define "half-hearted" as an adjective, not the past participle of a verb.

"Half-hearted" has a similar meaning, but more like "without enthusiasm" whereas "half-arsed" is more like "without competence".
Without enthusiasm actually means"without god."

I know we do not mean it like that now. Lack of commitment or energy or attitude is my take.

Half arsed is to me today in work, when a colleague is not pulling his/her weight.
 
  • #12
At my first job, my boss said,
“Don’t start a vast project with half-vast ideas.”
 
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