Oxidation - Reduction with copper and zinc

So, in summary, in the lab experiment, one well contained 1.0 M CuSO4 and a piece of zinc metal, while the other well contained 1.0 M ZnSO4 and a piece of copper metal. Based on the fact that zinc is a better reducing agent, the well where a reaction occurred (copper solution and zinc metal) would have the reduced form of zinc and oxidized form of copper, while the well where no reaction occurred (zinc solution and copper metal) would have the reduced form of copper and oxidized form of zinc.
  • #1
future_vet
169
0
Hello,

In a lab experiment, we filled 2 wells of a culture plate, one of them had 1.0 M CuSO4 and a piece of zinc metal, and the other well had 1.0 M ZnSO4 and a piece of copper metal.

My question is: Which well has the reduced form of zinc and the oxidized form of copper?

I know that zinc is a better reducing agent, and so I would say that the well where a reaction occurred (the one with the copper solution and zinc metal) is the one with the reduced form of zing and oxidized form of copper. Therefore, the well where no reaction happened, which had the zinc solution and copper metal, would be the one with the reduced form of copper and the oxidized form of zinc.

What do you think?

~J.
 
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  • #2
I think that pretty much gets it.
 

1. How does oxidation-reduction work with copper and zinc?

Oxidation-reduction, also known as redox, is a chemical reaction in which electrons are transferred between atoms. In the case of copper and zinc, copper atoms lose electrons (oxidation) while zinc atoms gain electrons (reduction).

2. What is the role of copper and zinc in oxidation-reduction reactions?

Copper and zinc are both considered good reducing agents, meaning they readily give up electrons. Copper is typically the oxidizing agent, while zinc is the reducing agent in redox reactions.

3. How do copper and zinc impact the rate of oxidation-reduction reactions?

The rate of oxidation-reduction reactions can be influenced by the surface area of the copper and zinc used. Finely divided metals have a larger surface area, allowing for more contact with the reactants and thus faster reaction rates.

4. Can oxidation-reduction reactions with copper and zinc be used for practical applications?

Yes, oxidation-reduction reactions with copper and zinc have many practical applications. These include the production of batteries, electroplating, and corrosion protection in metal structures.

5. Are there any safety precautions to consider when working with copper and zinc in oxidation-reduction reactions?

Yes, it is important to handle copper and zinc with care as they can be hazardous if ingested or inhaled. It is also important to follow proper disposal procedures for any waste products produced during the reaction.

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