Oxidisation of methanoic acid by kmno4

  • Thread starter timetraveller123
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Acid
In summary, the mechanism for producing ketones, carboxylic acids, and carbondioxide from alkenes in acidic conditions is dependent on the type of alkenes and the presence of a weak bond.
  • #1
timetraveller123
621
45
i was reading through my alkene notes and it said for strong oxidation of alkenes in acidic conditions results in formation of ketone , carboxylic acid or carbondioxide and water. But my notes doesn't detail the mechanism so i found some videos explaining how ketones and carboxylic acid may be formed . and from what i understand if the oxidation process results in formation of methanoic acid , it is further oxidised into CO2 and water. many website just state this . i am curious why it only happens to methanoic acid and not like ethanoic acid . Some websites said it is because of the hydrogen being the r group but if that is true then why is ethandioic acid also oxidised by kmno4 into CO2 and water. I am really confused. it would be really helpful if someone could explain this or could link to a website with the mechanism(it helps me to understand better). I am sorry if i don't make sense.
 
Last edited:
Chemistry news on Phys.org
  • #2
Methanoic acid is a bit similar in its properties to aldehydes (look at the molecule, can you see the -CHO group?)

I believe oxalic acid is a very specific case, not necessarily following rules that hold for most organic compounds.
 
  • #3
thats the thing i haven't learned about aldehydes yet many websites said the same thing but then why does it work for ethandioc acid it does not have coh group
 
  • #4
You do understand that oxalic acid and ethanedioic acid are the same substance and I already addressed your question?
 
  • #5
ya i do but i don't quite get what you mean by that statement as in why that exception for oxalic acidedit :
is there anywhere i can look up for the mechanism of this oxidisation
 
  • #6
It certainly is possible to decompose oxalic acid into CO and CO2. That's a classic method to produce CO in the laboratory. It is also possible to oxidize oxalic acid to CO2. That is basically the mechanism behind chemiluminescent lightsticks.
 
  • #7
Somewhat specific but I wouldn't say "very specific".
Under the oxidation conditions like KMnO4, most C-C bonds are not oxidized. So CH3COOH is not oxidized. However, some C-C bonds are weakened - HOOC-COOH among them, but I remember there are others. Don't quite remember which others, though.
 

Related to Oxidisation of methanoic acid by kmno4

1. What is the chemical reaction between methanoic acid and KMnO4?

The chemical equation for the reaction between methanoic acid (HCOOH) and KMnO4 is:
2HCOOH + 2KMnO4 + 3H2SO4 → 2CO2 + 2KHSO4 + 2MnSO4 + 3H2O

2. How does KMnO4 act as an oxidizing agent in this reaction?

KMnO4 acts as an oxidizing agent by donating oxygen atoms to the methanoic acid molecule. This causes the carbon in methanoic acid to lose electrons and become oxidized, while the manganese in KMnO4 gains electrons and becomes reduced.

3. What factors can affect the rate of this reaction?

The rate of the reaction between methanoic acid and KMnO4 can be affected by several factors, including concentration of reactants, temperature, and the presence of catalysts. Higher concentrations of reactants and higher temperature generally result in a faster reaction rate, while the presence of a catalyst can speed up the reaction without being consumed in the process.

4. What is the end product of this reaction?

The end products of the oxidation of methanoic acid by KMnO4 are carbon dioxide (CO2), potassium hydrogen sulfate (KHSO4), manganese sulfate (MnSO4), and water (H2O).

5. What are the uses of this reaction in practical applications?

The oxidation of methanoic acid by KMnO4 is commonly used in the production of formic acid, a versatile chemical used in various industries including agriculture, leather processing, and pharmaceuticals. It is also used in the production of other organic compounds and as a laboratory reagent for oxidizing alcohols and aldehydes.

Similar threads

Replies
16
Views
3K
  • Chemistry
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Chemistry
Replies
1
Views
998
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
28
Views
4K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
4K
Replies
2
Views
4K
Replies
2
Views
260
Back
Top