PHD in Computer Science with a concentration in Chaos Theory

  • #1
Hi everyone,

I am working on a second bachelor's degree in Computer Science, and am hoping to enter a Phd program in fall of 2019. Recently, I have taken an interest in Chaos Theory and was wondering if it is possible to do research in the field in the Computer Science department, or if it is usually the work of Physics Phds?

I plan on taking Physics 1, and Differential equations in the Spring 2018.

So far I have taken:
Calc 1 -3, Linear Algebra, Discrete mathematics, Calculus-based Probability, and Time Series Analysis. Along with my Computer science classes.

Thanks.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ZapperZ
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Hi everyone,

I am working on a second bachelor's degree in Computer Science, and am hoping to enter a Phd program in fall of 2019. Recently, I have taken an interest in Chaos Theory and was wondering if it is possible to do research in the field in the Computer Science department, or if it is usually the work of Physics Phds?

I plan on taking Physics 1, and Differential equations in the Spring 2018.

So far I have taken:
Calc 1 -3, Linear Algebra, Discrete mathematics, Calculus-based Probability, and Time Series Analysis. Along with my Computer science classes.

Thanks.
Here's the thing. To do a research work in a PhD program, there has to be a faculty member the department that you enrolled in to supervise your work. Typically, this person is an expert in the very area that you are working in. This faculty member controls almost every aspect of your work, and may even be the person who pays you research assistantship to do such work.

So the question isn't just "if I can do this work", rather, is there anyone in the department who CAN and willing to be the academic advisor/supervisor of that work! There is no point in wanting to do such-and-such, and there's no one there who is willing to be your official supervisor, because the dept. and the school will not let you continue.

Contact the school and the dept. you wish to enroll for your Ph.D work. Ask then this very same question you're asking here and see if there is at least one faculty member who knows this topic AND is willing to be your supervisor.

Zz.
 
  • #3
Here's the thing. To do a research work in a PhD program, there has to be a faculty member the department that you enrolled in to supervise your work. Typically, this person is an expert in the very area that you are working in. This faculty member controls almost every aspect of your work, and may even be the person who pays you research assistantship to do such work.

So the question isn't just "if I can do this work", rather, is there anyone in the department who CAN and willing to be the academic advisor/supervisor of that work! There is no point in wanting to do such-and-such, and there's no one there who is willing to be your official supervisor, because the dept. and the school will not let you continue.

Contact the school and the dept. you wish to enroll for your Ph.D work. Ask then this very same question you're asking here and see if there is at least one faculty member who knows this topic AND is willing to be your supervisor.

Zz.
Hey,

Thanks for the reply. I did a bit more soul searching yesterday, and it seems something along the lines of "Computational Physics" may be more aligned with what I am looking for.

I did end up researching different Quantum Information labs at schools like Pit and Maryland. Those seemed like a great intersection between Physics and CS, but it seems like I would need the knowledge of at least a B.S in Physics to go along with my Phd in CS. Do you think that If I self teach Physics to the level of scoring Moderately high on the Physics GRE, would be sufficient knowledge for something like Quantum Information? I'm talking about something like 2 years of self study from scratch.
 
  • #4
ZapperZ
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
35,847
4,670
Hey,

Thanks for the reply. I did a bit more soul searching yesterday, and it seems something along the lines of "Computational Physics" may be more aligned with what I am looking for.

I did end up researching different Quantum Information labs at schools like Pit and Maryland. Those seemed like a great intersection between Physics and CS, but it seems like I would need the knowledge of at least a B.S in Physics to go along with my Phd in CS. Do you think that If I self teach Physics to the level of scoring Moderately high on the Physics GRE, would be sufficient knowledge for something like Quantum Information? I'm talking about something like 2 years of self study from scratch.
This is now a different question. Start with this thread:

https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...if-my-bachelors-degree-isnt-in-physics.64966/

Zz.
 

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