Photographs that changed the world

  • Thread starter jobyts
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  • #26
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Oh I'm not so sure about this. Any parent would look at that pic and think, Bring the girl's parents in for questioning...NOW. At least that's what I thought....but then, I'm a mom.

My first thought was not HOW she got pregnant but WHO got a 5 year old pregnant. I was thinking that poor girl suffered enough getting pregnant and now she has to give birth. Someone needs to hang the [email protected]@ard.
 
  • #27
Astronuc
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My first thought was not HOW she got pregnant but WHO got a 5 year old pregnant. I was thinking that poor girl suffered enough getting pregnant and now she has to give birth. Someone needs to hang the [email protected]@ard.
Um - that was 71 years ago (1939) in Lima, Peru. He probably long dead.

As for the vulture stalking the child, that's the time to put the camera down and do something. My inclination would be to grab the child and get him/her to a clinic or hospital.
 
  • #28
Astronuc
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Is that for insurance purposes?

Still suicide by definition, though.
No it's a matter of avoiding having oneself incinerated by the flames or asphixiated from the smoke. Those folks on the floors where the planes hit and those above didn't have a chance of being rescued.

The response was slow and confusing because of poor communications, and of course there was no plan to rescue people from the roof because no one ever anticipated large aircraft crashing into the buildings, nor did they expect the buildings to collapse so readily.

I've seen many of those pictures, and some just after they were filmed.

It's sad to see that things like that still go on.
 
  • #29
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I think I am going to have nightmares over the photo of the baby being buried due to the chemical plant accident. The video of napalm girl is disturbing. You can see her skin peeling off.
 
  • #30
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No it's a matter of avoiding having oneself incinerated by the flames or asphixiated from the smoke. Those folks on the floors where the planes hit and those above didn't have a chance of being rescued.
I agree, but it's still, by definition, suicide. I know they don't want to call it suicide out of respect for the people, and it's an understandable case of suicide, but suicide nonetheless. We can't just disregard what words mean because some people put a negative connotation on 'suicide'. They had to pick their poison and they chose the lesser of two evils. There's nothing wrong with that.
 
  • #31
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Photographs that changed the world should be the ones where the picture, itself, had a huge impact on the public psyche. Some of those that just document an important moment in history could still be considered a picture that changed the world just because the picture so well captured the public psyche that the picture became a symbol of the event (i.e. - Iwo Jima flag raising and the sailor kissing a random girl on the street).

I think they came up short by at least one picture. The pictures of Abu Ghraib had at least as significant an impact on public opinion as the Napalm girl and execution of the Viet Nam war.

We didn't see many pictures in this country that displayed the civilian horrors in Iraq. Under google images using the term shock and awe I noticed a lot of buildings burning in the distance.

One picture did catch my eye albeit very disturbingly so.

Liberated boy:

http://www.artsjournal.com/herman/images/liberated_boy.jpg

Here is shock and awe cleaned up for the American public.

http://www.tonyrogers.com/images/weapons/b2bombs_300px.jpg
 
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  • #32
Evo
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I agree, but it's still, by definition, suicide. I know they don't want to call it suicide out of respect for the people, and it's an understandable case of suicide, but suicide nonetheless. We can't just disregard what words mean because some people put a negative connotation on 'suicide'. They had to pick their poison and they chose the lesser of two evils. There's nothing wrong with that.
It would also be suicide to stay inside and die. It's just deciding between a long or short death.

Also, the 5 year old girl, that was in a medical journal, it did not make the news, no one knew about it until someone found it 70 years later and posted it on the internet as an oddity.
 
  • #33
~christina~
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No one knows, they believe the father raped her but there wasn't enough evidence so charges were dropped against him. The girl wouldn't say anything about what had happened.

Apparently I read somewhere that she is still alive but the child (son) has since died. She still remains silent on the subject when asked though.
 
  • #34
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As for the vulture stalking the child, that's the time to put the camera down and do something. My inclination would be to grab the child and get him/her to a clinic or hospital.

The guilty feeling is believed to be what led eventually to the photographer's suicide.

I happened to meet a photo journalist recently and I asked him why the photographer didn't try to help the child. He didn't try to judge the photographer, but said that behavior did not surprise him. Photographers in war zone see lots of bloody scenes and get accustomed to just taking taking pictures and leaving the scene.
 
  • #35
Evo
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As for the vulture stalking the child, that's the time to put the camera down and do something. My inclination would be to grab the child and get him/her to a clinic or hospital.
According to the link, the NY Times said that after snapping the photo, he chased off the bird and that the child made it to the feeding center.

The bird wasn't attacking the child.
 

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