Phys.org, 768-km (477 mile) US megaflash lightning discharge

In summary, a single flash of lightning in the United States on April 29, 2020 set a new world record for the longest detected megaflash, stretching 768 kilometres across Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. This is equivalent to the distance between New York City and Columbus, Ohio, or between London and Hamburg. The previous record was set in Argentina in 2019. It's unclear if there were any reports of damage or power outages in the area where the record-breaking lightning occurred.
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Astronuc
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How often does something like this happen? It apparently stretched from central Texas, across Louisiana and Mississippi and into parts of Alabama, according to the image.
A single flash of lightning in the United States nearly two years ago cut across the sky for nearly 770 kilometres, setting a new world record, the United Nations said Tuesday.

The new record for the longest detected megaflash, measured in the southern US on April 29, 2020, stretched a full 768 kilometres, or 477.2 miles, across Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas.

That is equivalent to the distance between New York City and Columbus, Ohio, or between London and the German city of Hamburg, the UN's World Meteorological Organization (WMO) pointed out in a statement.
https://phys.org/news/2022-02-longest-lightning-miles-states.html

I've seen 'long' lightning bolts over a large city, but nothing like that mentioned above.

A single flash that developed continuously through a thunderstorm over Uruguay and northern Argentina on June 18, 2020 lasted for 17.1 seconds—0.37 seconds longer than the previous record set on March 4, 2019, also in northern Argentina.
 
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So that's where the Texas electricity went that we didn't have during the ice storm.

Maybe we were beaming someone somewhere.
 
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Wow, that's incredible! I've never seen anything like that before. It's amazing how long that lightning bolt lasted. I wonder if there were any reports of damage or power outages in the area where it occurred. It's definitely something to remember and maybe even research more about. Thanks for sharing this interesting information!
 

1. What is a megaflash lightning discharge?

A megaflash lightning discharge is an extremely rare and powerful form of lightning that travels horizontally across the sky for long distances, rather than the typical vertical lightning strike. It is characterized by its immense size and duration, with a length of at least 768 kilometers (477 miles) and lasting for several seconds.

2. How does a megaflash lightning discharge form?

A megaflash lightning discharge is believed to form in a similar way to regular lightning strikes, with the difference being the presence of strong horizontal winds that allow the lightning to travel for such long distances. These winds can be caused by thunderstorms, strong temperature gradients, or atmospheric disturbances.

3. What makes the US megaflash lightning discharge unique?

The 768-km (477 mile) US megaflash lightning discharge is unique because it is the longest recorded lightning strike in history. It occurred on October 31, 2018, in Oklahoma, USA, and was captured by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) using radio waves.

4. How often do megaflash lightning discharges occur?

Megaflash lightning discharges are extremely rare events and are estimated to occur only once every few years. This is due to the specific weather conditions and atmospheric dynamics that are required for their formation.

5. What are the potential dangers of megaflash lightning discharges?

Megaflash lightning discharges can be dangerous due to their immense size and duration. They can cause damage to buildings, power grids, and other infrastructure, as well as potentially injuring people or animals in their path. However, due to their rarity, the risk of being directly affected by a megaflash lightning discharge is low.

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