Physics Praxis Exam Help and Resources

In summary, a high school biology teacher is having trouble successfully passing the Physics Praxis 5265 Exam. He is reaching out for help and would like to know if there are any legit tutors or programs that could help him.
  • #1
rocky4920
19
2
Hello,
I have been having trouble successfully passing the Physics Praxis 5265 Exam. I am a high school biology teacher and have 30 college credits in Physics. My district wants me to teach Physics and I need to get my certification. Once I pass the praxis I will be able to teach.

I have taken the exam four times. The first time, I was rear-ended and got into a car accident on my way to the exam, so I technically do not count my first attempt because my mind was frazzled. The other three attempts I have been unsuccessful. I paid for an online tutoring service course to help me but it ended up being a scam.

I am reaching out because I want to know if there are any legit tutors or programs that could help me get on the path to passing this exam.

I have looked at numerous Youtube videos, Khan Academy, High School Textbooks, bought numerous practice exams, etc. I would like to find someone that can help me and any recommendations are appreciated.

Thank you.
 
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  • #2
There's something I don't understand. 30 hours is a lot. A major is usually about 35 hours. So you should know the material well beyond the exam level. Further, in 2018 you were asking high school level questions - maybe introductory college. So most of these classes need to be recent. I don't understand how you were able to solve advanced problems a year or two ago and can't solve simpler problems now.

If you want to pass the exam, all you have to do is get the textbook you will be teaching out of and work every problem. This takes about a summer. It will also prepare you very well for what you'll be teaching.

If you say "no, this takes too much time", that's fair, but then the question isn't "how do I pass?" but rather "what is the minimum I can do and still pass?" That's a tougher question.
 
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  • #3
Is there a practice test? The results from that will show you where you are deficient.
 
  • #4
osilmag said:
Is there a practice test?
rocky4920 said:
bought numerous practice exams
 
  • #5
Vanadium 50 said:
30 hours is a lot. A major is usually about 35 hours.
+1
 
  • #6
Vanadium 50, I guess the point I was trying to make was if he took the practice test and considered the results, not just only buying them. Studying what you already know is a waste of time.
 
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  • #7
Vanadium 50 said:
There's something I don't understand. 30 hours is a lot. A major is usually about 35 hours. So you should know the material well beyond the exam level. Further, in 2018 you were asking high school level questions - maybe introductory college. So most of these classes need to be recent. I don't understand how you were able to solve advanced problems a year or two ago and can't solve simpler problems now.

If you want to pass the exam, all you have to do is get the textbook you will be teaching out of and work every problem. This takes about a summer. It will also prepare you very well for what you'll be teaching.

If you say "no, this takes too much time", that's fair, but then the question isn't "how do I pass?" but rather "what is the minimum I can do and still pass?" That's a tougher question.
I graduated from college back in 2013 and had 15 credits. Yes, in 2017-2019 I took additional online classes to get me to 30 credits. "I don't understand how you were able to solve advanced problems a year or two ago and can't solve simpler problems now." Well, I didn't publish my post to be ridiculed... I struggle with tests and I have historically had issues with tests. I made my post asking for tips and strategies. I actually have done what you suggested. All winter I looked over a high school textbook and practiced solving problems. I am not looking for a minimum approach or mediocre approach.
 
  • #8
osilmag said:
Vanadium 50, I guess the point I was trying to make was if he took the practice test and considered the results, not just only buying them. Studying what you already know is a waste of time.
I agree, and I have been focusing on my areas of weakness from my practice test results.
 
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  • #9
rocky4920 said:
I looked over a high school textbook and practiced solving problems
That's not what I wrote. I didn't say to look over a random textbook and practice some problems. I said to take the texbook you would be teaching out of an to work every problem. Every single problem.
rocky4920 said:
"I don't understand how you were able to solve advanced problems a year or two ago and can't solve simpler problems now." Well, I didn't publish my post to be ridiculed..
What ridicule? I said I didn't understand something. I still don't.

You started off saying you have 30 credit hours in physics (which is 1-2 courses short of a major) implying that you have the material down cold, and it's merely a problem with test-taking. I don't think this is the case, and am beginning to conclude the test test is doing exactly what it is supposed to do: identify people who may be credentialled, but still don't know the material.

On February 10, 2018 you posted a high-school physics level question to homework help. It's good that you asked for help, but at the time you had completed at least 15 hours and were in the middle of the second 15 hours of college credit. There's simply no way anyone who has learned 30 credit hours worth of physics should struggle with a problem that elementary.

From this, it appears to me that your colleges didn't teach you what they promised you, certified that they did, and took your (or at least someone's) money to do so. I can understand why you might be angry. I would. But you should be angry at them, not us of Praxis.
 
  • #10
Vanadium 50 said:
That's not what I wrote. I didn't say to look over a random textbook and practice some problems. I said to take the texbook you would be teaching out of an to work every problem. Every single problem.

What ridicule? I said I didn't understand something. I still don't.

You started off saying you have 30 credit hours in physics (which is 1-2 courses short of a major) implying that you have the material down cold, and it's merely a problem with test-taking. I don't think this is the case, and am beginning to conclude the test test is doing exactly what it is supposed to do: identify people who may be credentialled, but still don't know the material.

On February 10, 2018 you posted a high-school physics level question to homework help. It's good that you asked for help, but at the time you had completed at least 15 hours and were in the middle of the second 15 hours of college credit. There's simply no way anyone who has learned 30 credit hours worth of physics should struggle with a problem that elementary.

From this, it appears to me that your colleges didn't teach you what they promised you, certified that they did, and took your (or at least someone's) money to do so. I can understand why you might be angry. I would. But you should be angry at them, not us of Praxis.
I never said I was angry or mad at you or the Praxis... I simply made this post to ask for some guidance towards the Praxis. I did not know that this would turn into the vetting of my past posts on here. I was under the impression the goal of this forum is supposed to be about helping out colleagues and future colleagues, and those who have questions about Physics. I made this post because other posts about the Praxis are from many years ago and wanted to see if there were any new tips of guidance.
 

1. What is the Physics Praxis Exam?

The Physics Praxis Exam is a standardized test designed to assess the knowledge and skills of individuals seeking to become licensed physics teachers in the United States. It covers various topics in physics including mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, waves and optics, and modern physics.

2. How can I prepare for the Physics Praxis Exam?

There are several resources available to help you prepare for the Physics Praxis Exam. These include study guides, practice tests, online courses, and review books. It is also helpful to review your notes from physics classes and to work through practice problems to strengthen your understanding of the material.

3. What is the passing score for the Physics Praxis Exam?

The passing score for the Physics Praxis Exam varies by state, but it is typically around 150-160 out of 200. It is important to check with your state's teacher licensing board to determine the specific passing score required.

4. Can I use a calculator on the Physics Praxis Exam?

Yes, a calculator is allowed on the Physics Praxis Exam. However, it must be an approved calculator and cannot have any built-in formulas or data. It is recommended to practice using a calculator similar to the one you plan to use on the exam to become familiar with its functions.

5. How many times can I take the Physics Praxis Exam?

The number of times you can take the Physics Praxis Exam varies by state. Some states have a limit on the number of attempts, while others allow unlimited attempts. It is important to check with your state's teacher licensing board for their specific policies.

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