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Physics Physics with a double major in Math. Need help!

  1. Jun 27, 2017 #1
    Hi everyone,

    I am currently in my second year in NTU Singapore. I am taking Physics with a second major in Mathematics.

    For physics, there is only the Pure Physics track for me. For mathematics however, I will soon have to choose between Pure Mathematics track and Applied Mathematics track. Which mathematics track do you think is best for me?

    Anyway, I actually have one more Mathematics track to choose besides the two mentioned above. My school offers the Statistic track for math majors. Do you think choosing this track will do me any good?

    Any advice or suggestions will be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 27, 2017 #2

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    If you're hanging in with Physics then the Applied Math makes more sense. However, if you really enjoy the math and might want to switch over to being a Math major then the Pure Math makes sense.

    I'd also look up what Applied Math subjects your school teaches and then you can decide how well they match with your physics. Often the Applied Math topics are useful when learning about computer simulation of physical systems.

    You could also talk with your physics advisor about it and get their input. Sometimes Pure Math may have useful application further on in your physics career.

    When I was in school, I was a Physics major who dared to take Algebraic Topology skipping Abstract Algebra and Set Theory with disastrous results as I often struggled with the proofs. However years later, I found that Algebraic Topology had uses in General Relativity which at the time were totally unknown.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spacetime_topology

    https://www.grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/Numbers/Math/Mathematical_Thinking/blackhl.htm
     
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