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Point body of mass hung from a ceiling on two ropes

  1. Dec 10, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    An object weighing 8.0 N is supported by two rope, which form the angles a and b to the horizontal, with tensions T1 and T2.
    angle a = 30 degrees
    angle b = 60 degrees
    I have calculated these values:
    T1 = 4N
    T2 = 6.93N

    How do I find the maximum tension of the obtained tension forces?
    How do find the minimal required tensile strength of the rope?




    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 10, 2016 #2
    Find the generic function for T1 and T2 in terms of angle they form with the horizontal and then find the maxima/minima of that function.
     
  4. Dec 10, 2016 #3

    haruspex

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    Maximum with respect to what, i.e. what is allowed to vary? Or maybe it is just the maximum of the two tensions?
    Perhaps you should post the entire question, word for word.
     
  5. Dec 11, 2016 #4
    q1) Find the larger value, Tmax , of the obtained tension forces.

    q2) plot the minimal required tensile strength of the rope as a function of the angle a . Keep the mass and angle b the same.
     
  6. Dec 11, 2016 #5
    Larger of T1 and T2 that you obtained in last post ?
     
  7. Dec 11, 2016 #6
     
  8. Dec 11, 2016 #7
    Then it is clear that T2 > T1 because I think 6.93 > 4.
     
  9. Dec 11, 2016 #8
    Sorry my mistake, if you change the position of rope T1 then a will change with b being constant.
    Ignore this.
     
  10. Dec 11, 2016 #9

    haruspex

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    Then you need to redo your calculation for the two tensions, but this time without plugging in a number for angle a. Just keep it as a variable.
     
  11. Dec 14, 2016 #10
    Is the sum of T1 and T2 equal to the minimal required tensile strength of the rope?
     
  12. Dec 14, 2016 #11

    haruspex

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    The ropes do not know about each other. If you were to make one rope very strong, would that help the other rope avoid breaking?
     
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