Pressure on a window of a submarine

In summary: However when the top of the water is sealed off by a cylinder, which is the case in the problem, the total pressure at depth d, p, will be equal to the cylinder pressure plus the water pressure at that depth. So we have p = p' + \rho gd. The cylinder is a solid object that does not allow water to pass through. So the pressure inside the cylinder is equal to the cylinder pressure, p'. Now, we have p = p' + \rho gd = p_o + \rho gd But if we subtract p_o from both sides, we get p - p_o = p' + \rho gd - p_o = p' - p_o + \rho gd = \
  • #1
indietro
46
0

Homework Statement


a research submarine has a 20 cm diameter window 8 cm think. the manufacturer says the window van withstand forces up to 1x106N. What is the submarine's maximum safe depth?


Homework Equations


p = po + [tex]\rho[/tex]gd


The Attempt at a Solution


p = F/A = 1X106 / 0.03 = 3.2x107 Pa

so now do i use p = po + [tex]\rho[/tex]gd ??

but if i do what would be my [tex]\rho[/tex]?
[tex]\rho[/tex] = m/v = m/[tex]\pi[/tex]r2h
how would i find mass?

thanks in advance for help!
 
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  • #2
ok so i solved it with the help of a different post but i had a question:
she does p' = p1 + [tex]\rho[/tex]gd
p' - p1 = [tex]\rho[/tex]gd

and then she says that p1 = 1x105 Pa > atmospheric pressure. I was just wondering why?

can someone explain how
[tex]\Delta[/tex]p = p1 - po relates or is used in conjunction with p' = p1 + [tex]\rho[/tex]gd? is [tex]\Delta[/tex]p = p'
 
  • #3
anyone??
 
  • #4
i really just can't seem to wrap my head around pressure concepts, if someone knows how to explain it clearly or knows a website where i can see examples and stuff that would be great!
 
  • #5
indietro said:
ok so i solved it with the help of a different post but i had a question:
she does p' = p1 + [tex]\rho[/tex]gd
p' - p1 = [tex]\rho[/tex]gd

and then she says that p1 = 1x105 Pa > atmospheric pressure. I was just wondering why?
it gets confusing with so many different letter variables like [tex] p, p_1, p_o, p', \rho [/tex] (and Pa for Paschals to boot), so let's define the variables:

let

[tex]p_o [/tex] = atmospheric pressure = 1.01(10^5) Paschals
[tex] p [/tex] = total pressure at depth d
[tex] \rho [/tex] = density of water = 1000kg/m^3)

Now when the top of the water is not sealed off (that is, it is exposed to the atmosphere),
[tex]p = p_o + \rho gd[/tex], that is , the total pressure at depth d is the sum total of the atmospheric pressure and the water pressure at that depth.
 

Related to Pressure on a window of a submarine

What is the purpose of a window on a submarine?

A window on a submarine allows natural light to enter the vessel, providing visibility for crew members and enhancing their situational awareness. It also serves as an emergency exit in case of an emergency.

How does the pressure on a window of a submarine differ from the pressure on a regular window?

The pressure on a window of a submarine is significantly higher due to the depth at which it operates. In addition, the pressure is constantly changing as the submarine dives deeper or resurfaces, putting immense stress on the window.

What materials are used to make windows for submarines?

The most commonly used material for submarine windows is acrylic plastic, also known as plexiglass. This material is lightweight, strong, and has good optical properties, making it suitable for use in deep-sea environments.

How are submarine windows designed to withstand high pressure?

Submarine windows are designed using thick layers of acrylic plastic, which are then bonded together with a strong adhesive. The shape of the window is also carefully designed to distribute the pressure evenly, preventing any weak points that could lead to cracks or breaks.

What happens if a submarine window breaks?

If a submarine window breaks, the sudden change in pressure can be catastrophic. The water rushing into the vessel can cause it to sink or lose control, putting the crew in danger. That's why regular maintenance and inspections of submarine windows are crucial for the safety of the crew.

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