Projectile motion -- launched 60° above the horizontal

In summary, the projectile is launched at an initial speed of 30 m/s at an angle of 60° above the horizontal and its velocity after 2 seconds is 9.8 m/s in the y direction.
  • #1
thegoosegirl42
22
1

Homework Statement


A projectile is launched at an initial speed of 30 m/s at an angle of 60° above the horizontal. Calculate the magnitude and direction of its velocity (a) 2s and (b) 5s after launch

Homework Equations


x=v*t in the x dimension
x= x+vt+(1/2)at^2

The Attempt at a Solution


I tried going through with the x dimension to solve for acceleration but the acceleration in the y is 9.8.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
thegoosegirl42 said:

Homework Statement


A projectile is launched at an initial speed of 30 m/s at an angle of 60° above the horizontal. Calculate the magnitude and direction of its velocity (a) 2s and (b) 5s after launch

Homework Equations


x=v*t in the x dimension
x= x+vt+(1/2)at^2

The Attempt at a Solution


I tried going through with the x dimension to solve for acceleration but the acceleration in the y is 9.8.

You need to be clear about which coordinate (x or y) represents the horizontal direction and which represents the vertical direction.

If x represents the horizontal direction, why do you think the projectile is accelerating in that direction?
 
  • #3
Given that x is horizontal and y is vertical, the starting point is to break the launch velocity into its horizontal vector (x) ( which is deemed to be constant velocity )
and its vertical vector (y) which comes under the influence of gravitational deceleration.
Ive attached a sheet, which won't solve your problem but might give you a start.
 

Attachments

  • p008.jpg
    p008.jpg
    82.8 KB · Views: 366
  • #4
The velocity change will only take place in the y direction. Calculate the x component of velocity and the y component after 2 seconds and find their resultant.
 
  • #5
SteamKing said:
You need to be clear about which coordinate (x or y) represents the horizontal direction and which represents the vertical direction.

If x represents the horizontal direction, why do you think the projectile is accelerating in that direction?
Yep thank you I was going in both.
 
  • #6
dean barry said:
Given that x is horizontal and y is vertical, the starting point is to break the launch velocity into its horizontal vector (x) ( which is deemed to be constant velocity )
and its vertical vector (y) which comes under the influence of gravitational deceleration.
Ive attached a sheet, which won't solve your problem but might give you a start.
Thank you very much that helped Immensely!
 
  • #7
siddharth23 said:
The velocity change will only take place in the y direction. Calculate the x component of velocity and the y component after 2 seconds and find their resultant.
Than you very much this made it so much easier!
 

1. What is projectile motion?

Projectile motion is the motion of an object through the air, propelled by some initial force and then affected by the force of gravity.

2. How is projectile motion different when launched at an angle of 60 degrees above the horizontal?

When launched at an angle of 60 degrees above the horizontal, the object will follow a curved path known as a parabola. This is because the initial force is acting in both the horizontal and vertical directions, causing the object to move in both directions simultaneously.

3. How does the initial velocity affect the range of a projectile launched at 60 degrees?

The initial velocity, or the speed and direction at which the object is launched, directly affects the range of a projectile. A higher initial velocity will result in a longer range, while a lower initial velocity will result in a shorter range. Additionally, the angle of launch also affects the range, with a 60 degree angle typically resulting in the maximum range possible for a given initial velocity.

4. What factors affect the trajectory of a projectile launched at 60 degrees?

The trajectory of a projectile launched at 60 degrees is affected by several factors, including the initial velocity, the angle of launch, the force of gravity, and air resistance. Additionally, any external forces acting on the object, such as wind or air currents, can also affect the trajectory.

5. Can a projectile launched at 60 degrees return to its original height?

No, a projectile launched at 60 degrees above the horizontal will not return to its original height. This is because the force of gravity will always pull the object down towards the ground, causing it to continue its parabolic path until it reaches the ground. However, if the launch angle is increased to 90 degrees, the object will reach its maximum height before falling back to the ground.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
432
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
773
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
822
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
15
Views
21K
Replies
3
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
Back
Top