Pursuing a PhD in Chemical Biology?

In summary, the individual started college as a biotechnology major but found it to be a simplified version of molecular and cellular biology. They switched to biochemistry and molecular biology with a focus on biochemistry, but had already taken two semesters of algebra-based physics which did not meet the requirements for the major. They ultimately ended up with a BS in biochemistry and molecular biology with a focus on molecular and cellular biology and a minor in chemistry. They are considering pursuing a PhD in chemical biology, as they are interested in studying small molecules and their effects on cells. They have completed various science courses, including calculus, biostatistics, and a range of chemistry and biology courses. They are expecting to graduate with a high GPA and are considering
  • #1
DanL
17
0
When I started college, I was a biotechnology major. I found this major be a dumbed down version of molecular and cellular biology, so I decided I wanted to switch out of it and major in biochemistry and molecular biology focusing in biochemistry, the problem was that I had already taken two semesters of algebra based physics, and the requirement for that major was calculus based physics. I ended up switching to biochemistry and molecular biology with a molecular and cellular biology focus which allowed algebra based physics (it was very similar to the biochemistry focus, only differing by 3 courses).
As I continued to take classes, I realized that I really like my chemistry courses (particularly organic chemistry) better than my molecular biology and cell biology courses, but don't get me wrong I still enjoyed the material. I also really liked my biochemistry courses (which involved a lot of organic chemistry).
At this point I am on track to receive a BS in biochemistry and molecular biology with a focus on molecular and cellular biology, and a minor in chemistry.
Will this be a good foundation for a PhD program in chemical biology? From what I am gathering, a BS in Chemistry focusing on organic chemistry with a minor in biochemistry may have been best.
What I am really interested in is studying small molecules and their interactions and effects on the cell, for which a PhD in Chemical Biology is ideal.
I'm expecting to graduate with a GPA of about 3.90

Here is a list of the science courses I have completed and will complete:
Calculus 1
Calculus 2
Biostatistics
Physics 1: classical mechanics (algebra based)
Physics 2: electricity and magnetism, light and optics, with a small amount of quantum + relativity (algebra based)
General Chemistry 1
General Chemistry 2
Organic Chemistry 1
Organic Chemistry 2
Physical Chemistry: Chemical Thermodynamics (calculus based)
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry (calculus based)
Inorganic Chemistry
Transition Metal Chemistry
Biochemistry 1: Protein structure and function
Biochemistry 2: Metabolic pathways
Molecular and Cell biology 1
Molecular and Cell biology 2
Molecular biology of the gene
Developmental biology
Cell Growth and Differentiation
Principles of Immunology
Genetic analysis
Lab in proteins, nucleic acids, and molecular cloning
Lab in protein purification and enzymology
Lab in molecular genetics
Analytical techniques in biochemistry
Molecular and Cell toxicology
 
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  • #2
You should quite easily get a PhD position in top universities like Cambridge. Just find supervisor first. PhD is all about supervisor. For example, I could suggest Ben Davis or Christopher Schofield as the brightest chemical biologist in the University of Oxford.
 

Related to Pursuing a PhD in Chemical Biology?

1. What is Chemical Biology?

Chemical Biology is a field that combines principles and techniques from both chemistry and biology to study biological processes at a molecular level. It involves the use of chemical tools and techniques to understand and manipulate biological systems.

2. What are the benefits of pursuing a PhD in Chemical Biology?

There are several benefits to pursuing a PhD in Chemical Biology. This degree can open up a wide range of career opportunities, such as in research and development, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry. It also allows for interdisciplinary training and development of skills in both chemistry and biology, making graduates highly versatile and marketable in the job market.

3. What are the requirements for a PhD in Chemical Biology?

The specific requirements for a PhD in Chemical Biology may vary depending on the institution, but generally, applicants should have a strong background in chemistry, biology, and other related fields. Most programs also require applicants to have a bachelor's or master's degree in a relevant field, as well as satisfactory scores on the GRE and letters of recommendation.

4. How long does it take to complete a PhD in Chemical Biology?

The length of a PhD program in Chemical Biology can vary, but on average, it takes about 5-6 years to complete. This includes coursework, research, and writing and defending a dissertation. The duration may also depend on factors such as the student's research progress and the program's specific requirements.

5. What career opportunities are available for graduates with a PhD in Chemical Biology?

Graduates with a PhD in Chemical Biology have a wide range of career opportunities available to them. They can pursue careers in academia as professors or researchers, work in research and development in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industries, or even venture into entrepreneurship. Other potential career paths include science writing, patent law, and consulting.

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